San Antonio, TX, August 16, 2016

The Kingsport Fire Department (KFD) received its fourth consecutive designation as an Accredited Agency. Chief Craig Dye and Assistant Chief Scott Boyd presented the Kingsport Fire Department’s submission and received the results of the Commission on Fire Accreditation International (CFAI) review at Fire Rescue International in San Antonio, TX. The hearing culminated a year long process by the Kingsport Fire Department’s Accreditation Team.

The CFAI confers Accredited Agency status for a period of five years, during which an agency must submit four Annual Compliance Reports to demonstrate their continued compliance with core performance indicators and report on progress in executing their plans for improvement. The Commission determines if the reports are acceptable and the agency may retain its accredited status. At the end of the fifth year, an Accredited Agency must seek reaccreditation and successfully complete the peer review process to remain accredited.

Early in 2016, Kingsport Fire Department’s (KFD) Accreditation Committee and members of the Board of Mayor and Alderman met with a Fire Service Peer Assessment Team for review and recommendations toward the KFD’s Accreditation with the Commission on Fire Accreditation International (CFAI).

The Peer Assessment Team consisted of Chief Mike Stallings, Rock Mount (NC) Fire Department (retired), Chief Matt Knott, Rockford (IL) Fire Department, Chief Andrew Ansley, Monroe (NC) Fire Department and Chief Josh Smith, Statesville (NC) Fire Department.

In 2001, Kingsport Fire Department was one of the first 40 Fire Departments in the world to obtain the Commission on Fire Accreditation International designation. In 2006 and 2011 the KFD again awarded the designation. Currently the Kingsport Fire Department is one of only four fire departments in the state of Tennessee and was one of the first 40 in the world recognized as an Accredited Agency through the Center for Public Safety Excellence Commission’s Fire Accreditation International. Brentwood (TN) Fire & Rescue, City of Maryville (TN) Fire Department, and the City of Alcoa Fire Department are the only other agencies in Tennessee to achieve this designation.

Special thanks to the Kingsport Fire Department’s (KFD) Accreditation Committee Members for their hard work:

Chief Craig Dye

Assistant Chief Scott Boyd

Deputy Chief David Chase

Deputy Chief Darrell Hayes

Deputy Chief Jim Everhart

Fire Marshal Robert Sluss

Senior Captain Joel Jones

Captain Max Bear

Captain Jessie Bishop

Captain Chris Lowe

Captain David Mitchell

Captain Ben Wexler

Assistant Fire Marshal Chris Vandagriff

Public Education Officer Barry Brickey

Executive Secretary Alison Shaffer

Center for Public Safety Excellence Mission:
The mission of the Center for Public Safety Excellence is “To lead the fire and emergency service to excellence through the continuous quality improvement process of accreditation, credentialing, and education.”

Accreditation

Accreditation is a comprehensive self-assessment and evaluation model that enables organizations to examine past, current, and future service levels and internal performance and compare them to industry best practices. This process leads to improved service delivery.

CPSE’s Accreditation Program, administered by the Commission on Fire Accreditation International (CFAI) allows fire and emergency service agencies to compare their performance to industry best practices in order to:

  • Determine community risk and safety needs and develop community-specific Standards of Cover.
  • Evaluate the performance of the department.
  • Establish a method for achieving continuous organizational improvement.

Local government executives face increasing pressure to “do more with less” and justify their expenditures by demonstrating a direct link to improved or expanded services. Particularly for emergency services, local officials need criteria to assess professional performance and efficiency. The CFAI accreditation process provides a well-defined, internationally-recognized benchmark system to measure the quality of fire and emergency services.

Kingsport Fire Department (KFD) to Present and Receive Results of the Commission on Fire Accreditation International (CFAI) Review

Tuesday August 16, 2016, 3PM – 4PM

Chief Craig Dye and Assistant Chief Scott Boyd will be San Antonio, TX to present the Kingsport Fire Department’s submission and receive the results of the Commission on Fire Accreditation International (CFAI) review. The hearings will be broadcast over the internet at http://cpse.distancelearningcenter.com. Chief Dye and Assistant Chief Boyd are scheduled to present for Kingsport on Tuesday, August 16, between 3PM – 4PM.  The hearing will culminate a year long process by the Kingsport Fire Department’s Accreditation Team. In 2001, Kingsport Fire Department was one of the first 30 Fire Departments in the world to receive the Commission on Fire Accreditation International designation. In 2006 and 2011 the KFD again received the honor.

The CFAI is part of the Center for Public Safety Excellence (CPSE).

CPSE Mission
The mission of the Center for Public Safety Excellence is “To lead the fire and emergency service to excellence through the continuous quality improvement process of accreditation, credentialing, and education.”

Accreditation

Accreditation is a comprehensive self-assessment and evaluation model that enables organizations to examine past, current, and future service levels and internal performance and compare them to industry best practices. This process leads to improved service delivery.

CPSE’s Accreditation Program, administered by the Commission on Fire Accreditation International (CFAI) allows fire and emergency service agencies to compare their performance to industry best practices in order to:

  • Determine community risk and safety needs and develop community-specific Standards of Cover.
  • Evaluate the performance of the department.
  • Establish a method for achieving continuous organizational improvement.

Local government executives face increasing pressure to “do more with less” and justify their expenditures by demonstrating a direct link to improved or expanded services. Particularly for emergency services, local officials need criteria to assess professional performance and efficiency. The CFAI accreditation process provides a well-defined, internationally-recognized benchmark system to measure the quality of fire and emergency services.

 

Domtar Presents the Kingsport Fire Department with check to purchase a new Sparky the Fire Dog Robot.

Mike Cunningham HR Director with Domtar stated,

“At Domtar, we know the value of safety and, particularly, the safety education provided by the Kingsport Fire Department.

When we learned that the department was looking to update an integral part of its fire safety education program, we wanted to see what we could do to help out.

I think everyone is familiar with Sparky the Fire Dog, considered to be the best-known figure in fire safety education across the country. Sparky has been a part of the Kingsport Fire Department for nearly a decade.

Although Sparky continues to be popular with children, he has started to show his age.

So today, on behalf of Domtar and the nearly 400 workers at our Kingsport mill and Ridgefields converting facility, I would like to present this check in the amount of $12,000 to the Kingsport Fire Department so they can replace Sparky and continue the good work they do in fire safety education”

KFD Wants You to Have a Safe, Burn & Injury Free Fourth of July

Fireworks during the Fourth of July are as American as baseball and apple-pie, but did you know that more fires are reported on that day than on any other day of the year in the United States? Nearly half of these fires are caused by fireworks. Consumer fireworks include sparklers and firecrackers. Any consumer firework can be dangerous. The Kingsport Fire Department urges residents to enjoy local professional fireworks displays.

Kingsport City Ordinances specifically prohibit the manufacture, use, discharge, possession with the intent to discharge, or sale of fireworks within the city limits.

The use of Sky Lanterns (aka “Chinese Lanterns” or “Wish Lanterns”) is prohibited in the State of Tennessee.

Consumer fireworks such as sparklers burn at over 1200 degrees and will cause third degree burns.  There are no safe consumer fireworks!

If you live in an area where fireworks are permissible follow these safety tips from the National Fire Protection Association:

Fireworks Tips:
  • Leave fireworks to the professionals.
  • Do not use consumer fireworks
  • Never allow young children to play with or ignite fireworks.
  • Make sure fireworks are legal in your area before buying or using them.
  • Avoid buying fireworks that come in brown paper packaging, as this can often be a sign that the fireworks were made for professional displays and could pose a danger to consumers.
  • Adults should always supervise fireworks activities. Parents often don’t realize that there are many injuries from sparklers to children under five. Sparklers burn at temperatures above 1,200 degrees – hot enough to melt glass.
  • Never have any portion of your body directly over a fireworks device when lighting the fuse. Move back to a safe distance immediately after lighting.
  • Never try to re-light or pick up fireworks that have not fully functioned.
  • Never point or throw fireworks at another person.
  • Keep a bucket of water or a garden hose handy in case of fire or other mishap.
  • Light one item at a time then move back quickly.
  • Never carry fireworks in a pocket or shoot them off in metal or glass containers.
  • After fireworks fully complete their functioning, douse the spent device with plenty of water from a bucket or hose before discarding to prevent a trash fire.
  • Children should never pick up fireworks that may be left over, they may still be active. Remember to cool a burn with running water then seek immediate medical attention or call 911.
Fireworks by the numbers: 
  • From 2009-2013, U.S. fire departments responded to an average of 18,500 fires caused by fireworks. These fires included 1,300 structure fires, 300 vehicle fires and 16,900 outside and other fires. An estimated two people were killed in these fires.
  • In 2014, U.S. hospital emergency rooms treated an estimated 10,500 people for fireworks related injuries; 51% of those injuries were to the extremities and 38% were to the head. These injury estimates were obtained or derived from the Consumer Product Safety Commission’s2014 Fireworks Annual Report by Yongling Tu and Demar Granados.
  • The risk of fireworks injury is highest for young people ages 5-9, followed by children 10-19.
  • More than one-quarter (28%) of fires started by fireworks in 2009-2013 were reported on July 4th. Almost half (47%) of the reported fires on the Fourth of July were started by fireworks.

Source: NFPA’s Fireworks report, by Marty Ahrens, June 2016 www.nfpa.org

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The Kingsport Fire Department Reminds Residents to Take Caution in the Heat

 

Heat-related deaths and illness are preventable, yet annually many people succumb to extreme heat. With temperatures in the upper 90’s this week, the Kingsport Fire Department and the Center for Disease control offer these tips:

 

Infants and young children are sensitive to the effects of extreme heat, and must rely on other people to keep them cool and hydrated.
  • Never leave infants or children in a parked car. Nor should pets be left in parked cars—they can suffer heat-related illness too.
  • Dress infants and children in loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Seek medical care immediately if your child has symptoms ofsymptoms of heat-related illness.

 

Muscle cramping might be the first sign of heat-related illness, and may lead to heat exhaustion or stroke. Here is how you can recognize heat exhaustion and heat stroke and what to do:

 

Heat Exhaustion

·        Heavy sweating

·        Weakness

·        Cold, pale, and clammy skin

·        Fast, weak pulse

·        Nausea or vomiting

·        Fainting

What You Should Do:

·        Move to a cooler location.

·        Lie down and loosen your clothing.

·        Apply cool, wet cloths to as much of your body as possible.

·        Sip water.

·        If you have vomited and it continues, seek medical attention immediately.

Heat Stroke

·        High body temperature (above 103°F)*

·        Hot, red, dry or moist skin

·        Rapid and strong pulse

·        Possible unconsciousness

What You Should Do:

·        Call 911 immediately — this is a medical emergency.

·        Move the person to a cooler environment.

·        Reduce the person’s body temperature with cool cloths or even a bath.

·        Do NOT give fluids.

 

 

Keep your body temperature cool to avoid heat-related illness.
  • Stay in air-conditioned buildings as much as possible.
  • Find an air-conditioned shelter.
  • Do not rely on a fan as your primary cooling device.
  • Avoid direct sunlight.
  • Wear lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Take cool showers or baths.
  • Check on those most at-risk twice a day.
Because your body loses fluids through sweat, you can become dehydrated during times of extreme heat.
  • Drink more water than usual.
  • Don’t waituntil you’re thirsty to drink more fluids.
  • Drink from two to four cups of water every hour while working or exercising outside.
  • Avoid alcohol or liquids containing high amounts of sugar.
  • Remind others to drink enough water.
Stay updated on local weather forecasts so you can plan activities safely when it’s hot outside.

Source-Center For Disease Control www.cdc.gov

June 9, 2016
At 11:03am The Kingsport Fire Department (KFD) was dispatched to investigate a call of a person on the arch under the Hammond Bridge on Ft Henry Dr. On arrival a person was located and appeared to be unconscious. The south bound lanes of Ft Henry Dr. were closed by the Kingsport Police as the KFD and Kingsport Life Saving Crew (KLSC) personnel set up for a technical rescue. KLSC also deployed a boat in the Holston River.
KFD Firefighters were able to rapell down to the man. The man was harnessed and pulled to safety. He was transported to the hospital by Sullivan County EMS

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 School’s almost out, Memorial day is around the corner, Fire up the Grills!

The Kingsport Fire Department wants you to have a safe grilling season and summer break. Fire in the grill, under hot dogs and burgers, is a welcome sight at the family cookout. But fire anywhere else can make your summer kick-off barbecue memorable for all the wrong reasons. To keep you and your family safe while grilling, follow these general guidelines from the National Fire Protection Association:

General grilling tips
  • Propane and charcoal BBQ grills should only be used outdoors.
  • The grill should be placed well away from the home, deck railings and out from under eaves and overhanging branches.
  • Keep children and pets away from the grill area.
  • Keep your grill clean by removing grease or fat buildup from the grills and in trays below the grill.
  • Never leave your grill unattended.
 
Before you use your gas grill:
  • Check the major connection points between the gas (propane) tank hose and the regulator and cylinder, and where the hose connects to the burners. Tighten if loose.
  • Check the gas (propane) tank hose for the potential (gas) leaks. To do that:
  • Apply a light soap and water solution to the hose using a brush or spray bottle.
  • Turn the propane tank on. If there is a gas leak, the propane will release bubbles around the hose (big enough to see).
  • If there are no bubbles, your grill is safe to use.
  • If there are bubbles, turn off the tank and check connections, then have your grill serviced by a professional before using it again.
  • If the leak doesn’t stop, call the fire department immediately.
When the grill is on:
  • As you are cooking, if you smell gas, turn off the gas tank and burners.
  • If the leak stops immediately, get the grill serviced by a professional before using it again.
  • If the smell continues, move away from the grill and call the fire department immediately. Do not move the grill.
Charcoal Grills for cooking

There are several ways to get the charcoal ready to use. Charcoal chimney starters allow you to ignite the charcoal using newspaper as a fuel:

  • If you use a charcoal chimney, use a long match to avoid burning your fingers when lighting the paper
  • If you choose to use lighter fluid, use only fluid intended for charcoal grills
  • Never add charcoal starter fluid to coals or kindling that has already been ignited
  • Never use gasoline or any other flammable liquid except charcoal starter or lighter fluid to start a charcoal fire
While cooking
  • Place the grill well away from overhanging branches according to the manufacturer’s instructions
  • Place the grill a safe distance from lawn games, play areas and foot traffic
  • Keep children and pets, and anything that can burn like food wrappers, an oven mitt or towel, at least 3-feet away from open flames and the grill
  • Use long-handled grilling tools to give the chef plenty of clearance from heat and flames
  • Have an adult present at all times when a campfire or grill is burning. Keep the fire small and never leave a fire unattended!
To dispose of charcoal after cooking
  • Before going to sleep or leaving the area, douse the fire with water and make sure the area is cool to the touch.
  • Five percent of outside or unclassified grill fires occurred in a lawn, field or open area
  • Empty the coals into a metal container with a tight-fitting lid that is used only to collect coals
  • Place the container outside and away from anything that can burn
  • Never empty coals directly into a trash can
  • Store the charcoal starter fluid out of reach of children and away from heat source

Source www.nfpa.org