KFD_News_46

KINGSPORT – Your home should be a safe haven. But do you regularly check your smoke alarms? If not, there is the potential for danger. Thats why the Kingsport Fire Department is teaming up with NFPA for Fire Prevention Week and all of October to remind residents that Working Smoke Alarms Save Lives, Test Yours Every Month!

  • Almost three of five (60%) of reported home fire deaths in 2007 to 2011 resulted from fires in homes with no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms.
  • Working smoke alarms cut the risk of dying in reported home fires in half.
  • In fires considered large enough to activate the smoke alarm, hardwired alarms operated 93% of the time, while battery powered alarms operated only 79% of the time.
  • When smoke alarms fail to operate, it is usually because batteries are missing, disconnected, or dead.
  • An ionization smoke alarm is generally more responsive to flaming fires and a photoelectric smoke alarm is generally more responsive to smoldering fires. For the best protection, or where extra time is needed, to awaken or assist others, both types of alarms, or combination ionization and photoelectric alarms are recommended.
  • Additionally residents are urged learn how to plan and practice escape from a home in case a fire occurs.

The History of Fire Prevention Week

Fire Prevention Week was established to commemorate the Great Chicago Fire, the tragic 1871 conflagration that killed more than 250 people, left 100,000 homeless, destroyed more than 17,400 structures and burned more than 2,000 acres. The fire began on October 8, but continued into and did most of its damage on October 9, 1871.

Commemorating a conflagration

According to popular legend, the fire broke out after a cow – belonging to Mrs. Catherine O’Leary – kicked over a lamp, setting first the barn, then the whole city on fire. Chances are you’ve heard some version of this story yourself; people have been blaming the Great Chicago Fire on the cow and Mrs. O’Leary, for more than 130 years. But recent research by Chicago historian Robert Cromie has helped to debunk this version of events.

But if a cow wasn’t to blame for the huge fire, what was? Over the years, journalists and historians have offered plenty of theories. Some blamed the blaze on a couple of neighborhood boys who were near the barn sneaking cigarettes. Others believed that a neighbor of the O’Leary’s may have started the fire. Some people have speculated that a fiery meteorite may have fallen to earth on October 8, starting several fires that day – in Michigan and Wisconsin, as well as in Chicago.

The biggest blaze that week
While the Great Chicago Fire was the best-known blaze to start during this fiery two-day stretch, it wasn’t the biggest. That distinction goes to the Peshtigo Fire, the most devastating forest fire in American history. The fire, which also occurred on October 8th, 1871, and roared through Northeast Wisconsin, burning down 16 towns, killing 1,152 people, and scorching 1.2 million acres before it ended.

Historical accounts of the fire say that the blaze began when several railroad workers clearing land for tracks unintentionally started a brush fire. Before long, the fast-moving flames were whipping through the area ‘like a tornado,’ some survivors said. It was the small town of Peshtigo, Wisconsin that suffered the worst damage. Within an hour, the entire town had been destroyed.

Nine decades of fire prevention
Those who survived the Chicago and Peshtigo fires never forgot what they’d been through; both blazes produced countless tales of bravery and heroism. But the fires also changed the way that firefighters and public officials thought about fire safety. On the 40th anniversary of the Great Chicago Fire, the Fire Marshals Association of North America (today known as the International Fire Marshals Association), decided that the anniversary of the Great Chicago Fire should henceforth be observed not with festivities, but in a way that would keep the public informed about the importance of fire prevention.  The commemoration grew incrementally official over the years.

In 1920, President Woodrow Wilson issued the first National Fire Prevention Day proclamation, and since 1922, Fire Prevention Week has been observed on the Sunday through Saturday period in which October 9 falls. According to the National Archives and Records Administration’s Library Information Center, Fire Prevention Week is the longest running public health and safety observance on record. The President of the United States has signed a proclamation proclaiming a national observance during that week every year since 1925.

Home Fire Safety Tips and Facts:

Home fires

  • In 2011, U.S. fire departments responded to 370,000 home structure fires. These fires caused 13,910 civilian injuries, 2,520 civilian deaths, $6.9 billion in direct damage.
  • On average, seven people died in U.S. home fires per day from 2007 to 2011.
  • Cooking is the leading cause home fires and home fire injuries, followed heating equipment.
  • Smoking is a leading cause of civilian home fire deaths.
  • Most fatal fires kill one or two people. In 2012, 8 home fires killed five or more people resulting in a total of 44 deaths.
  • According to an NFPA survey, only one-third of Americans have both developed and practiced a home fire escape plan.
  • Almost three-quarters of Americans do have an escape plan; however, more than half never practiced it.
  • One-third (32%) of respondents who made an estimate thought they would have at least 6 minutes before a fire in their home would become life threatening. The time available is often less. Only 8% said their first thought on hearing a smoke alarm would be to get out!
  • During 2007-2011 candles caused 3% of home fires, 4% of home fire deaths, 7% of home fire injuries and 6% of direct property damage from home fires.
  • On average, there are 32 home candle fires reported per day.
  • More than one-third of these fires (36%) started in the bedroom; however, the candle industry found that only 13% of candle users burn candles in the bedroom most often.
  • Nearly three in five candle fires (56%) start when things that can burn are too close to the candle.

Escape Planning

  • According to an NFPA survey, only one-third of Americans have both developed and practiced a home fire escape plan.
  • Almost three-quarters of Americans do have an escape plan; however, more than half never practiced it.
  • One-third (32%) of respondents who made an estimate thought they would have at least 6 minutes before a fire in their home would become life threatening. The time available is often less. Only 8% said their first thought on hearing a smoke alarm would be to get out!

Cooking

  • U.S. Fire Departments responded to an estimated annual average of 156,600 cooking-related fires between 2007-2011, resulting in 400 civilian deaths, 5,080 civilian injuries and $853 million in direct damage.
  • Two of every five home fires started in the kitchen.
  • Unattended cooking was a factor in 34% of reported home cooking fires.
  • Two-thirds of home cooking fires started with ignition of bard or other cooking materials.
  • Ranges accounted for the 57% of home cooking fire incidents. Ovens accounted for 16%.
  • Children under five face a higher risk of non-fire burns associated with cooking and hot bard and drinks than being burned in a cooking fire.
  • Microwave ovens are one of the leading home products associated with scald burn injuries not related to fires. According to the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System, two out of five of the microwave oven injuries seen at emergency rooms in 2011 were scald burns.
  • Clothing was the item first ignited in less than 1% of home cooking fires, but these incidents accounted for 15% of the cooking fire deaths.

Heating

  • The leading factor contributing to heating equipment fires was failure to clean, principally creosote from solid fueled heating equipment, primarily chimneys.
  • Portable or fixed space heaters, including wood stoves, were involved in one-third (33%) of home heating fires and four out of five (81%) home heating deaths.
  • Half of home heating fire deaths resulted from fires caused by heating equipment too close to things that can burn, such as upholstered furniture, clothing, mattresses or bedding.
  • In most years, heating equipment is the second leading cause of home fires, fire deaths, and fire injuries.
  • Fixed or portable space heaters are involved in about 4 out of 5 heating fire deaths.

Smoking materials

  • During 2007-2011 smoking materials caused an estimated 17,900 home structure fires, resulting in 580 deaths, 1,280 injuries and $509 million in direct property damage, per year.
  • Sleep was a factor in 31% of the home smoking material fire deaths.
  • Possible alcohol impairment was a factor in one in five (18%) of home smoking fire deaths.
  • In recent years, Canada and the United States have required that all cigarettes sold must be “fire safe,” that is have reduced ignition strength and less likely to start fires.

Electrical

  • About half (48%) of home electrical fires involved electrical distribution or lighting equipment. Other leading types of equipment were washer or dryer, fan, portable or stationary space heater, air conditioning equipment water heater and range.
  • Electrical failure or malfunctions caused an average of almost 48,000 home fires per year, resulting in roughly 450 deaths and nearly $1.5 billion in direct property damage.

Candles

  • According to an NFPA survey, only one-third of Americans have both developed and practiced a home fire escape plan.
  • Almost three-quarters of Americans do have an escape plan; however, more than half never practiced it.
  • One-third (32%) of respondents who made an estimate thought they would have at least 6 minutes before a fire in their home would become life threatening. The time available is often less. Only 8% said their first thought on hearing a smoke alarm would be to get out!

– Reproduced from NFPA’s Fire Prevention Week website, www.firepreventionweek.org. ©2014 NFPA

For more information contact the Kingsport Fire Departments Public Education Officer Barry Brickey at 423-224-2820

October is Fire Prevention Month in Kingsport

Your home should be a safe haven. But do you regularly check your smoke alarms? If not, there is the potential for danger. That’s why the Kingsport Fire Department is teaming up with NFPA for Fire Prevention Week and all of October to remind residents that “Working Smoke Alarms Save Lives, Test Yours Every Month!”

  • Almost three of five (60%) of reported home fire deaths in 2007 to 2011 resulted from fires in homes with no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms.
  • Working smoke alarms cut the risk of dying in reported home fires in half.
  • In fires considered large enough to activate the smoke alarm, hardwired alarms operated 93% of the time, while battery powered alarms operated only 79% of the time.
  • When smoke alarms fail to operate, it is usually because batteries are missing, disconnected, or dead.
  • An ionization smoke alarm is generally more responsive to flaming fires and a photoelectric smoke alarm is generally more responsive to smoldering fires. For the best protection, or where extra time is needed, to awaken or assist others, both types of alarms, or combination ionization and photoelectric alarms are recommended.
  • Additionally residents are urged learn how to plan and practice escape from a home in case a fire occurs.

 

The History of Fire Prevention Week

Fire Prevention Week was established to commemorate the Great Chicago Fire, the tragic 1871 conflagration that killed more than 250 people, left 100,000 homeless, destroyed more than 17,400 structures and burned more than 2,000 acres. The fire began on October 8, but continued into and did most of its damage on October 9, 1871.

Commemorating a conflagration
According to popular legend, the fire broke out after a cow – belonging to Mrs. Catherine O’Leary – kicked over a lamp, setting first the barn, then the whole city on fire. Chances are you’ve heard some version of this story yourself; people have been blaming the Great Chicago Fire on the cow and Mrs. O’Leary, for more than 130 years. But recent research by Chicago historian Robert Cromie has helped to debunk this version of events.

But if a cow wasn’t to blame for the huge fire, what was? Over the years, journalists and historians have offered plenty of theories. Some blamed the blaze on a couple of neighborhood boys who were near the barn sneaking cigarettes. Others believed that a neighbor of the O’Leary’s may have started the fire. Some people have speculated that a fiery meteorite may have fallen to earth on October 8, starting several fires that day – in Michigan and Wisconsin, as well as in Chicago.

The biggest blaze that week
While the Great Chicago Fire was the best-known blaze to start during this fiery two-day stretch, it wasn’t the biggest. That distinction goes to the Peshtigo Fire, the most devastating forest fire in American history. The fire, which also occurred on October 8th, 1871, and roared through Northeast Wisconsin, burning down 16 towns, killing 1,152 people, and scorching 1.2 million acres before it ended.

Historical accounts of the fire say that the blaze began when several railroad workers clearing land for tracks unintentionally started a brush fire. Before long, the fast-moving flames were whipping through the area ‘like a tornado,’ some survivors said. It was the small town of Peshtigo, Wisconsin that suffered the worst damage. Within an hour, the entire town had been destroyed.

Nine decades of fire prevention
Those who survived the Chicago and Peshtigo fires never forgot what they’d been through; both blazes produced countless tales of bravery and heroism. But the fires also changed the way that firefighters and public officials thought about fire safety. On the 40th anniversary of the Great Chicago Fire, the Fire Marshals Association of North America (today known as the International Fire Marshals Association), decided that the anniversary of the Great Chicago Fire should henceforth be observed not with festivities, but in a way that would keep the public informed about the importance of fire prevention.  The commemoration grew incrementally official over the years.

In 1920, President Woodrow Wilson issued the first National Fire Prevention Day proclamation, and since 1922, Fire Prevention Week has been observed on the Sunday through Saturday period in which October 9 falls. According to the National Archives and Records Administration’s Library Information Center, Fire Prevention Week is the longest running public health and safety observance on record. The President of the United States has signed a proclamation proclaiming a national observance during that week every year since 1925.

 

Home Fire Safety Tips and Facts:

Home fires

  • In 2011, U.S. fire departments responded to 370,000 home structure fires. These fires caused 13,910 civilian injuries, 2,520 civilian deaths, $6.9 billion in direct damage.
  • On average, seven people died in U.S. home fires per day from 2007 to 2011.
  • Cooking is the leading cause home fires and home fire injuries, followed heating equipment.
  • Smoking is a leading cause of civilian home fire deaths.
  • Most fatal fires kill one or two people. In 2012, 8 home fires killed five or more people resulting in a total of 44 deaths.
  • According to an NFPA survey, only one-third of Americans have both developed and practiced a home fire escape plan.
  • Almost three-quarters of Americans do have an escape plan; however, more than half never practiced it.
  • One-third (32%) of respondents who made an estimate thought they would have at least 6 minutes before a fire in their home would become life threatening. The time available is often less. Only 8% said their first thought on hearing a smoke alarm would be to get out!
  • During 2007-2011 candles caused 3% of home fires, 4% of home fire deaths, 7% of home fire injuries and 6% of direct property damage from home fires.
  • On average, there are 32 home candle fires reported per day.
  • More than one-third of these fires (36%) started in the bedroom; however, the candle industry found that only 13% of candle users burn candles in the bedroom most often.
  • Nearly three in five candle fires (56%) start when things that can burn are too close to the candle.

Escape Planning

  • According to an NFPA survey, only one-third of Americans have both developed and practiced a home fire escape plan.
  • Almost three-quarters of Americans do have an escape plan; however, more than half never practiced it.
  • One-third (32%) of respondents who made an estimate thought they would have at least 6 minutes before a fire in their home would become life threatening. The time available is often less. Only 8% said their first thought on hearing a smoke alarm would be to get out!

Cooking

  • U.S. Fire Departments responded to an estimated annual average of 156,600 cooking-related fires between 2007-2011, resulting in 400 civilian deaths, 5,080 civilian injuries and $853 million in direct damage.
  • Two of every five home fires started in the kitchen.
  • Unattended cooking was a factor in 34% of reported home cooking fires.
  • Two-thirds of home cooking fires started with ignition of food or other cooking materials.
  • Ranges accounted for the 57% of home cooking fire incidents. Ovens accounted for 16%.
  • Children under five face a higher risk of non-fire burns associated with cooking and hot food and drinks than being burned in a cooking fire.
  • Microwave ovens are one of the leading home products associated with scald burn injuries not related to fires. According to the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System, two out of five of the microwave oven injuries seen at emergency rooms in 2011 were scald burns.
  • Clothing was the item first ignited in less than 1% of home cooking fires, but these incidents accounted for 15% of the cooking fire deaths.

Heating

  • The leading factor contributing to heating equipment fires was failure to clean, principally creosote from solid fueled heating equipment, primarily chimneys.
  • Portable or fixed space heaters, including wood stoves, were involved in one-third (33%) of home heating fires and four out of five (81%) home heating deaths.
  • Half of home heating fire deaths resulted from fires caused by heating equipment too close to things that can burn, such as upholstered furniture, clothing, mattresses or bedding.
  • In most years, heating equipment is the second leading cause of home fires, fire deaths, and fire injuries.
  • Fixed or portable space heaters are involved in about 4 out of 5 heating fire deaths.

Smoking materials

  • During 2007-2011 smoking materials caused an estimated 17,900 home structure fires, resulting in 580 deaths, 1,280 injuries and $509 million in direct property damage, per year.
  • Sleep was a factor in 31% of the home smoking material fire deaths.
  • Possible alcohol impairment was a factor in one in five (18%) of home smoking fire deaths.
  • In recent years, Canada and the United States have required that all cigarettes sold must be “fire safe,” that is have reduced ignition strength and less likely to start fires.

Electrical

  • About half (48%) of home electrical fires involved electrical distribution or lighting equipment. Other leading types of equipment were washer or dryer, fan, portable or stationary space heater, air conditioning equipment water heater and range.
  • Electrical failure or malfunctions caused an average of almost 48,000 home fires per year, resulting in roughly 450 deaths and nearly $1.5 billion in direct property damage.

Candles

  • During 2007-2011 candles caused 3% of home fires, 4% of home fire deaths, 7% of home fire injuries and 6% of direct property damage from home fires.
  • On average, there are 32 home candle fires reported per day.
  • More than one-third of these fires (36%) started in the bedroom; however, the candle industry found that only 13% of candle users burn candles in the bedroom most often.
  • Nearly three in five candle fires (56%) start when things that can burn are too close to the candle.
– Reproduced from NFPA’s Fire Prevention Week website, www.firepreventionweek.org. ©2014 NFPA

For more information contact the Kingsport Fire Department’s Public Education Officer Barry Brickey at 423-224-2820

Flying_Pig2_3

Pig is an exciting new Arts Space.

The Gallery & Studios will be open Thursday, Friday & Saturday from 10 am to 7 pm.

The gallery side will feature Fine Art and Fine Craft by several nationally-acclaimed artists & craftspeople. All artwork is for sale. There will be a series of art classes offered to the public over the next few months. There will also be professional artist studios located in the space where the public will be able to see the actual production of art work as well as interact with the artists. Spaces are still available.

The Flying Pig Studios will feature several exhibits and working artists. Finished animals, rounding boards, and bird paintings for the Carousel Project will be on display. Carousel Carvers and painters will be present to demonstrate and explain processes. In addition to Carousel merchandise, remaining sponsorship opportunities will be on display including the band organ, angel panels and Penny Press Machine. Engage Kingsport will resume selling Pavers to be placed at the Kingsport Press Memory Fountain and the Light the Way campaign kicks off Thursday night. Friends of the Carousel First Rider tickets will also be available. “We hope to finish out Campaign 2014 with at least 1000 Friends of the Carousel First Riders,” explained Carousel Chairman Reggie Martin. Construction has begun on the Roundhouse and the working Carousel should be open for rides in spring 2015. “We have several large grants pending but are depending on the final sponsorships and Friends of the Carousel First Riders to provide funding for the connector building and gift shop/welcome center.”

Through November, the Studios will also feature an exhibit from the Levine Museum of the New South on “John Nolen: Neighborhood-Maker” about the work of Cambridge landscape designer John Nolen who is considered the father of modern city planning. Nolen was influential on the plan of Kingsport and worked with several other notable cities.

The Kingsport Carousel store will be located within the studios until the construction of the Carousel’s Roundhouse is complete. Beautiful T-shirts, note cards, posters & more will be for sale.

Kingsport Police Department

200 Shelby Street • Kingsport, TN 37660

ThomasMPatton • 423-229-9433 (Desk) • 423-224-2786 (FAX)

http://Police.KingsportTN.govwww.KingsportPDBlog.com

NEWS RELEASE
SUBJECT: Kingsport Police Officers Rescue Neglected Puppy from Apartment Fire/Resident Arrested
DATE: September 29, 2014
GENERAL NARRATIVE
On September 26, 2014 at approximately 8:45 PM, Kingsport Police Officers patrolling in the area of Cloud Apartments in Kingsport were alerted by a nearby resident that apartment #47, located at 1212 Robertson Street, was on fire. Officers Brooke Bowers, Craig Dunworth, and Jesse Griggs rushed to the scene. They heard a smoke alarm and smelled smoke emanating from the apartment. A neighbor told them she believed that the apartment resident, later identified as Samantha A. Stidham, might still be inside.

The officers forced open the door of the apartment and began to search the interior for potential victims of the fire. No people were found inside; however, a small gray and white puppy, believed to be approximately 2-3 months old, crawled out from underneath the bed in an upstairs bedroom and stumbled down the stairs. The puppy appeared emaciated, frightened, and neglected. Its ribs, shoulder and hip bones, and spine were all visibly protruding under its skin and there were pink sores on the puppy’s shoulders. A neighbor brought food and water, and the puppy desperately consumed it.

The source of the smoke turned out to be an oven that had been left on by Ms. Stidham. Kingsport Fire Fighters responded and extinguished the fire and rendered the apartment safe.

Shortly after the fire was extinguished, Ms. Stidham returned home from a trip to a convenience store. She confirmed that she was the resident of the apartment and the owner of the puppy. She told the officers that she did not have any food for the puppy, because she could not afford it; however, she did appear to own numerous non-essential items including a large television, DVD movies, a cell phone, and cigarettes.

Ms. Stidham was arrested for Aggravated Cruelty to Animals and was transported to the Kingsport City Jail. The puppy was turned over to SBK Animal Shelter for proper care and safekeeping.

SUSPECT INFORMATION
Name Samantha A. Stidham
Age Date of Birth 3/21/1994

20 Years of Age

Race/Gender White/Female
Residency Cloud Apartments

1212 Robertson Street, Apt. #47

Kingsport, TN

Charge(s) Aggravated Cruelty to Animals

RELEASING OFFICER
Thomas M. Patton, Public Information Officer

Kingsport Police Department Professional Standards Unit

Kingsport Police Department

200 Shelby Street • Kingsport, TN 37660

ThomasMPatton • 423-229-9433 (Desk) • 423-224-2786 (FAX)

http://Police.KingsportTN.govwww.KingsportPDBlog.com

NEWS RELEASE
SUBJECT: Couple Charged in Aggravated Robbery Conspiracy
DATE: September 29, 2014
GENERAL NARRATIVE
On September 27, 2014 at approximately 9:15 PM, Kingsport Police Officers from the Patrol and Criminal Investigations Divisions responded to Model City Apartments, located at 1000 Stonegate Road in Kingsport, in reference to an armed robbery of an individual. Officers spoke with the victim, a 24 year old black male, who had been invited to this location by Mariah Jean Holt, whom he had previously dated.

The investigation revealed that Ms. Holt had invited the victim to meet her via a series of text messages under the false pretense of a romantic rendezvous. When the victim arrived, rather than being greeted by Ms. Holt, he was approached by an individual later identified as Travis K. Nelms, Jr. who is Ms. Holt’s current boyfriend.

Mr. Nelms had concealed his face by wrapping a shirt around his head. He pointed a semi-automatic handgun at the victim and ordered him to strip off all of his clothing. Once the clothing was removed, Mr. Nelms stole a brand new iPhone 6 Plus from the pocket of the victim’s pants. Mr. Nelms then attempted to punch the victim but missed. In fear of being shot or otherwise assaulted, the victim fled from the scene, naked and on foot.

Mr. Nelms and Ms. Holt were quickly developed as suspects. Ms. Holt was located at Model City Apartments and was promptly arrested as a party to the crime of Aggravated Robbery.

Mr. Nelms is still at large. A warrant has been obtained, charging him with Aggravated Robbery. He is described as a 21 year old white male, approximately 5 feet, 10 inches in height and weighing approximately 170 pounds, with blonde hair and blue eyes. He should be considered armed and dangerous. Anyone knowing his whereabouts is asked to contact the K.P.D. Criminal Investigations Division at 423-229-9429 or Kingsport Central Dispatch at 423-246-9111.

SUSPECT INFORMATION
Name Travis K. Nelms, Jr.
Age Date of Birth 7/5/1993

21 Years of Age

Race/Gender White/Male
Residency Model City Apartments

1000 Stonegate Road, Apt. # R-15

Kingsport, TN

Height/

Weight

5 feet, 10 inches

170 pounds

Hair/Eyes Blonde/Blue
Charge(s) Aggravated Robbery

SUSPECT INFORMATION
Name Mariah Jean Holt
Age Date of Birth 1/23/1990

24 Years of Age

Race/Gender White/Female
Residency Model City Apartments

1000 Stonegate Road, Apt. # R-15

Kingsport, TN

Charge(s) Aggravated Assault (Party to the Crime)

RELEASING OFFICER
Thomas M. Patton, Public Information Officer

Kingsport Police Department Professional Standards Unit

Cultural_Arts2_0

WHEN: Thursday, October 2, 2014 from 5pm- 7pm WHERE: 246 and 252 Broad Street, Kingsport, Tennessee COST: $0 www.EngageKingsport.com (423) 392-8414

Kingsport Office of Cultural Arts and Engage Kingsport announce the Grand Opening and Opening Reception for Flying Pig Gallery & Studios on October 2, 2014 from 5 pm to 7 pm. Flying Pig is an exciting new Arts Space located in two adjacent buildings located on the corner of Broad and Center streets in Downtown Kingsport, TN.‚  The Gallery & Studios will be open Thursday, Friday & Saturday from 10 am to 7 pm.

The gallery side will feature Fine Art and Fine Craft by several nationally-acclaimed artists & craftspeople. All artwork is for sale. There will be a series of art classes offered to the public over the next few months. There will also be professional artist studios located in the space where the public will be able to see the actual production of art work as well as interact with the artists. Spaces are still available.

The Flying Pig Studios will feature several exhibits and working artists.‚  Finished animals, rounding boards, and bird paintings for the Carousel Project will be on display.‚  Carousel Carvers and painters will be present to demonstrate and explain processes.‚  In addition to Carousel merchandise, remaining sponsorships opportunities will be on display including the band organ, angel panels and light boards.‚  Friends of the Carousel First Rider tickets will also be available.‚  We hope to finish out Campaign 2014 with at least 1000 Friends of the Carousel First Riders, explained Carousel Chairman Reggie Martin.‚  Construction has begun on the Roundhouse and the working Carousel should be open for rides in April 2015.‚  We have several large grants pending but are depending on the final sponsorships and Friends of the Carousel First Riders to provide funding for the connector building and gift shop/welcome center.

Through November, the Studios will also feature an exhibit from the Levine Museum of the New South on John Nolen: Neighborhood-Maker about the work of Cambridge landscape designer John Nolen who is considered the father of modern city planning.‚  Nolen was influential on the plan of Kingsport, Tennessee and worked with several other notable cities including: Madison, WI,‚  Montclair, NJ,‚  Reading, PA,‚  Roanoke, VA,‚  San Diego, CA,‚  New London, CT,‚  Savannah, GA, and‚ Schenectady, NY.

The Kingsport Carousel store (future gift shop) will be located within the studios until the construction of the Carousels Roundhouse next to the Farmers Market is complete next year. Beautiful T-shirts, notecards, posters & more will be for sale.

The opening reception of Flying Pig Gallery & Studio is free and open to the public.

Senior_Center1_0

KINGSPORT – The Senior Services Fair sponsored by Kingsport Senior Center, is scheduled this year for Tuesday, October 14, from 9am-11:30.

Seniors, families and the community are invited and encouraged to attend the event, which provides great information from senior services, in our area, such as transportation, alternative housing options, Medicare Advantage Plans, home health care, medical and non-medical, non-profit services and more. Organizations from the TriCities and the surrounding areas will be in attendance, to offer information, valuable to anyone aging, or helping a loved one age in the Best Place to Be-Kingsport!

Kingsport Police Department

200 Shelby Street • Kingsport, TN 37660

ThomasMPatton@KingsportTN.gov • 423-229-9433 (Desk) • 423-224-2786 (FAX)

http://Police.KingsportTN.govwww.KingsportPDBlog.com

NEWS RELEASE
SUBJECT: K.P.D. Investigating Fatal Motor Vehicle Collision Involving a Motorcycle on West Stone Drive
DATE: September 26, 2014
GENERAL NARRATIVE
On September 25, 2014 at approximately 9:15 PM, Kingsport Police Patrol and Traffic Units responded to the 600 block of West Stone Drive at the intersection with Sherman Place in reference to a fatal motor vehicle collision involving a motorcycle and another vehicle. The subsequent investigation revealed the following:

A 2002 Chrysler PT Cruiser 4-door hatchback, driven by Rachel N. Rhoton, was traveling east on West Stone Drive in the far left eastbound lane approaching the intersection with Sherman Place. A 1997 Harley Davidson Heritage Softail motorcycle, operated by Jack H. Coffey, was traveling west on West Stone Drive; however, it was traveling left of center (on the wrong side of the road) in the same eastbound lane, headed directly toward the Chrysler.

The motorcycle struck the Chrysler head-on. Mr. Coffey was thrown from the motorcycle and was killed in the crash. Ms. Rhoton and her passenger both sustained non-life threatening injuries and were transported to Holston Valley Medical Center by Sullivan County E.M.S. for treatment.

This crash is still under investigation by the K.P.D. Traffic Unit.

COLLISION VEHICLE INFORMATION
Make Harley Davidson
Model Heritage Softail
Year 1997
Type Motorcycle
Color Black
Damage Disabling Damage
Driver Name Jack H. Coffey
Age 56 Years of Age
Race/Gender White/Male
Residency Johnson City, TN
Injuries Fatal
COLLISION VEHICLE INFORMATION
Make Chrysler
Model PT Cruiser
Year 2002
Type 4-door Hatchback
Color Purple
Damage Disabling Damage
Driver Name Rachel N. Rhoton
Age 18 Years of Age
Race/Gender White/Female
Residency Kingsport, TN
Injuries Non-Life Threatening
Passenger Name Sarah L. Arnold
Age 25 Years of Age
Race/Gender White/Female
Residency Kingsport, TN
Injuries Non-Life Threatening
RELEASING OFFICER
Thomas M. Patton, Public Information Officer

Kingsport Police Department Professional Standards Unit

Road_Construction_57

KINGSPORT ‚¬ One lane of Memorial Boulevard will be closed Friday, September 26, 2014 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. to allow Public Works crews to remove a tree overhanging the travel lane. The lane closure will occur in the westbound lane between the intersections with Beverly Hills Street and Hawthorne Street. ‚ Motorists should plan ahead and use the utmost caution in the work zone.

Kingsport Police Department

200 Shelby Street • Kingsport, TN 37660

ThomasMPatton@KingsportTN.gov • 423-229-9433 (Desk) • 423-224-2786 (FAX)

http://Police.KingsportTN.govwww.KingsportPDBlog.com

NEWS RELEASE
SUBJECT: K.P.D. on Scene of Serious Motor Vehicle Collision on West Stone Drive
DATE: September 25, 2014
GENERAL NARRATIVE
On September 25, 2014 at approximately 9:15 PM Kingsport Police Patrol and Traffic Units responded to the 600 block of West Stone Drive at the intersection with Sherman Place in reference to a serious motor vehicle collision involving a motorcycle and another vehicle. Crash investigators are in the preliminary stages of the investigation.

Motorists are asked to avoid the area and seek an alternate route for the next few hours.

Further information will be released as it becomes available.

RELEASING OFFICER
Thomas M. Patton, Public Information Officer

Kingsport Police Department Professional Standards Unit