Kingsport Police Department

200 Shelby Street • Kingsport, TN 37660

ThomasMPatton • 423-229-9433 (Desk) • 423-224-2786 (FAX)

http://Police.KingsportTN.govwww.KingsportPDBlog.com

NEWS RELEASE
SUBJECT: Unrestrained Passenger Dies as Result of Airport Parkway Crash
DATE: December 30, 2015
CASE #: 15-027970
GENERAL NARRATIVE
The Kingsport Police Department has been notified by Holston Valley Medical Center personnel that Raythen Fayne Blankenship has died after succumbing to injuries sustained in the recent Airport Parkway motor vehicle collision. His death came at approximately 12:40 PM on December 30, 2015, just three days after the crash.

Mr. Blankenship was a passenger in a Toyota Tacoma operated by Billy J. Stevens. It was being driven on the wrong side of the road, when it struck a Subaru Outback, driven by Kathleen J. Kooiker, head-on. Mr. Blankenship was not wearing his seatbelt as required by Tennessee state law. The other two individuals involved in this crash were properly restrained and survived the crash.

Wearing a seatbelt can easily make the difference in a motorist being seriously injured or killed in a crash versus literally walking away from the crash with minor injuries or completely unscathed. The Kingsport Police Department encourages ALL occupants of ALL motor vehicles to wear their seatbelt ALL of the time. It is the law, but more importantly, it might just save a life.

This crash remains under investigation by the K.P.D. Traffic Unit with potential charges pending.

As previously released:

On December 27, 2015 at approximately 6:20 AM, Kingsport Police Patrol Officers responded to a major motor vehicle collision on Airport Parkway (State Route 357) near Centenary Road in Kingsport. Due to the severity of injuries, the K.P.D. Traffic Unit was called out to reconstruct the crash. Their subsequent investigation revealed the following:

A 2016 Subaru Outback, driven by Kathleen J. Kooiker, was traveling (correctly) north in the northbound lanes of Airport Parkway. A 2002 Toyota Tacoma, occupied by driver Billy J. Stevens and passenger Raythen F. Blankenship, was traveling (incorrectly) south in the northbound lanes of travel, left of the center grass median, head-on into oncoming traffic. While the precise reason why Mr. Stevens was driving on the wrong side of the road has yet to be determined, it can possibly be attributed to him driving in dark and foggy conditions on an unfamiliar stretch of roadway.

The Toyota struck the Subaru in a head-on impact. All three occupants received serious incapacitating injuries and were transported to Holston Valley Hospital by Sullivan County E.M.S. Both vehicles sustained disabling damage and had to be towed from the scene. Several lanes of Airport Parkway remained closed for approximately three hours to allow for a thorough investigation and safe removal of vehicles and debris.

It is important to note that two of the individuals involved in this crash were properly restrained as required by law; however, Mr. Blankenship was not wearing his seatbelt, and not by coincidence, he was also the most seriously injured of the three.

Wearing a seatbelt can easily make the difference in a motorist being seriously injured or killed in a crash versus literally walking away from the crash with minor injuries or completely unscathed. The Kingsport Police Department encourages ALL occupants of ALL motor vehicles to wear their seatbelt ALL of the time. It is the law, but more importantly, it might just save a life.

This crash remains under investigation by the K.P.D. Traffic Unit with potential charges pending.

COLLISION VEHICLE #1 INFORMATION
Make Toyota
Model Tacoma
Year 2002
Type Compact Pickup
Color Maroon
Damage Disabling Damage
Driver Name Billy Joe Stevens
Age 39 Years of Age
Gender/Race Male/White
Residency Vansant, Virginia
Injuries Incapacitating Injuries
Passenger Name Raythen Fayne Blankenship
Age 44 Years of Age
Gender/Race Male/White
Residency Vansant, Virginia
Injuries Fatal Injuries
COLLISION VEHICLE #2 INFORMATION
Make Subaru
Model Outback
Year 2016
Type Sport Utility Wagon
Color Gray
Damage Disabling Damage
Driver Name Kathleen Joan Kooiker
Age 58 Years of Age
Gender/Race Female/White
Residency Osceola, Iowa
Injuries Incapacitating Injuries
RELEASING OFFICER
Thomas M. Patton, Public Information Officer

Kingsport Police Department Professional Standards Unit

Kingsport Police Department

200 Shelby Street • Kingsport, TN 37660

ThomasMPatton • 423-229-9433 (Desk) • 423-224-2786 (FAX)

http://Police.KingsportTN.govwww.KingsportPDBlog.com

NEWS RELEASE
SUBJECT: K.P.D. Investigating Early Morning Head-On Car Crash on Airport Parkway
DATE: December 27, 2015
CASE #: 15-027970
GENERAL NARRATIVE
On December 27, 2015 at approximately 6:20 AM, Kingsport Police Patrol Officers responded to a major motor vehicle collision on Airport Parkway (State Route 357) near Centenary Road in Kingsport. Due to the severity of injuries, the K.P.D. Traffic Unit was called out to reconstruct the crash. Their subsequent investigation revealed the following:

A 2016 Subaru Outback, driven by Kathleen J. Kooiker, was traveling (correctly) north in the northbound lanes of Airport Parkway. A 2002 Toyota Tacoma, occupied by driver Billy J. Stevens and passenger Raythen F. Blankenship, was traveling (incorrectly) south in the northbound lanes of travel, left of the center grass median, head-on into oncoming traffic. While the precise reason why Mr. Stevens was driving on the wrong side of the road has yet to be determined, it can possibly be attributed to him driving in dark and foggy conditions on an unfamiliar stretch of roadway.

The Toyota struck the Subaru in a head-on impact. All three occupants received serious incapacitating injuries and were transported to Holston Valley Hospital by Sullivan County E.M.S. Both vehicles sustained disabling damage and had to be towed from the scene. Several lanes of Airport Parkway remained closed for approximately three hours to allow for a thorough investigation and safe removal of vehicles and debris.

It is important to note that two of the individuals involved in this crash were properly restrained as required by law; however, Mr. Blankenship was not wearing his seatbelt, and not by coincidence, he was also the most seriously injured of the three.

Wearing a seatbelt can easily make the difference in a motorist being seriously injured or killed in a crash versus literally walking away from the crash with minor injuries or completely unscathed. The Kingsport Police Department encourages ALL occupants of ALL motor vehicles to wear their seatbelt ALL of the time. It is the law, but more importantly, it might just save a life.

This crash remains under investigation by the K.P.D. Traffic Unit with potential charges pending.

COLLISION VEHICLE #1 INFORMATION
Make Toyota
Model Tacoma
Year 2002
Type Compact Pickup
Color Maroon
Damage Disabling Damage
Driver Name Billy Joe Stevens
Age 39 Years of Age
Gender/Race Male/White
Residency Vansant, Virginia
Injuries Incapacitating Injuries
Passenger Name Raythen Fayne Blankenship
Age 44 Years of Age
Gender/Race Male/White
Residency Vansant, Virginia
Injuries Incapacitating Injuries
COLLISION VEHICLE #2 INFORMATION
Make Subaru
Model Outback
Year 2016
Type Sport Utility Wagon
Color Gray
Damage Disabling Damage
Driver Name Kathleen Joan Kooiker
Age 58 Years of Age
Gender/Race Female/White
Residency Osceola, Iowa
Injuries Incapacitating Injuries
RELEASING OFFICER
Thomas M. Patton, Public Information Officer

Kingsport Police Department Professional Standards Unit

The_Stray_Birds_Pic2

WHEN: Friday February 19, 2016 at 7:30 pm

WHERE: Renaissance Arts Center Theatre in Kingsport, Tennessee

COST: Reserved Seats $15

BOOK NOW: www.EngageKingsport.com (423) 392-8414

KINGSPORT – The Kingsport Office of Cultural Arts and Engage Kingsport present an evening with The Stray Birds and special guest Amythyst Kiah on Friday, February 19, 2016 at the Renaissance Arts Center Theatre in Kingsport.‚  Tickets are $15. This show is part of The Engage Kingsport Performing Arts Series 2016 winter lineup.‚ ‚  Engage Kingsport Performing Arts Series shows feature reserved seating in the beautiful Renaissance Arts Center Theatre, a 350 seat theatre.‚  Tickets are available online at EngageKingsport.com or at the Office of Cultural Arts at 1200 E. Center Street, Kingsport or by phone at (423) 392-8414.


The Stray Birds

The Stray Birds have been flying high since the 2012 release of their critically acclaimed self-titled album, The Stray Birds. Two years, hundreds of gigs, and thousands of highway miles later, the genre-melding acoustic trio made its Yep Roc Records debut with Best Medicine, released on‚ October 21, 2014.

This is the first time that we have written music within the context of being a consistent, traveling, performing band says de Vitry. These songs have been largely inspired by places weve been or experiences weve had on the road. The albums title track, Best Medicine was inspired by a trip to Schenectady, New York, a town with a lively record store amidst countless abandoned storefronts. This juxtaposition, along with the fascinating life story of the record shops proprietor, led de Vitry to pen the lyrics, You never know the gold you can find out there / ‚¬Til you put the needle down and do some digging in the air‚¬¦if the body is a temple, the soul is a bell/ And thats why music is the best medicine I sell.”

The band ‚¬ multi-instrumentalists and vocalists Maya de Vitry, Oliver Craven, and Charlie Muench ‚¬ hails from Lancaster, Pennsylvania. All three are classically-trained musicians whove been making music of all kinds since childhood (before they reconnected through the local music scene, de Vitry and Muench first met in middle school orchestra); however, they were also all raised with a steady diet of music ranging from pioneers like The Carter Family and Bill Monroe & His Blue Grass Boys to the joyous invention of The Beatles and The Band, to the groundbreaking artistry of Jimi Hendrix.

After college, Craven was playing with Muench in a bluegrass band called River Wheel when he and de Vitry first met. Craven and de Vitry began sharing their original songs with one another, playing local open mics, and busking regularly at Lancasters Central Market. In an effort to preserve their songs before an impending parting, the pair recorded the Borderland EP in a friends basement studio in 2010. Muench appeared as a guest bassist on a few tracks.

It was only a year before the trio would wrap up other endeavors and reassemble in a recording studio, independently releasing their first full-length album, The Stray Birds, in 2012. Making that record was a really great process for us to learn how we work together as a band explains de Vitry. The album became a critical darling: NPR included it on their 10 Best Folk/Americana Albums of the Year list and several songs from the project were in heavy rotation on taste-making radio stations like WXPN.

The albums success earned The Stray Birds performance slots at prestigious events like the Philadelphia, Kerrville, and Falcon Ridge Folk Festival and legendary venues like Nashvilles famous bluegrass club and The Station Inn. Their steadily increasing popularity led to an appearance on Mountain Stage, where their spellbinding harmonies captivated audiences nationwide and helped to build a dedicated fanbase in the UK and Ireland as well.

The trio, who roots music site No Depression praised as a band destined for global success received rave reviews at the 2014 Celtic Connections Festival in Scotland and followed that appearance with a number of sold-out dates in England and Ireland.

Where their previous releases (aside from the 2013 EP, Echo Sessions, which consisted of covers of songs penned by Townes Van Zandt, The Louvin Brothers, Jimmie Rodgers, Nanci Griffith, and Susanna Clark) consisted nearly entirely of songs that the band members wrote individually while remaining close to home, for Best Medicine, the bands primary songwriters, Maya and Oliver, wrote new, original material inspired by their last two and a half years on the road; then The Stray Birds honed the majority of these songs onstage together.

When the group began to work on their new album at Stonebridge Studios in Leesburg, Virginia, The Stray Birds and their co-producer Stuart Martin pursued a method of recording that was unlike any other project the band had ever made before. Its more us states Craven. Instead of recording in isolation as they did on The Stray Birds, for Best Medicine, the band eschewed booths and headphones, instead recording the majority of their material live off the floor, in the same room, each musician playing and singing around a microphone, capturing the energy and the familial feel of their live shows. There were few overdubs, which were largely used by the Birds to give several songs an extra layer of texture by adding more instrumental tracks (ranging from slide guitar to piano) instead of using session musicians.

By the time we recorded this album, singing together had become so natural explains de Vitry. It had become familial rather than just professional. Our vocal ranges and tones were complementary to begin with, but our inflection and phrasing evolved so effortlessly once we were singing out on the road every night.

Muench agrees, noting, I think the three of us have really gelled and inhabited The Stray Birds as a single entity. In the beginning it was ‚¬Maya and Oliver and Charlie sometimes playing music together. Now we are a solid unit.

In addition to being their strongest, most personal, and most authentic album to date, Best Medicine is an album of firsts for these three musicians: it is the bands first full-length album where Charlie Muench sings lead on a song, a jaunty, fiddle-laced version of the traditional tune Pallet which has long been a fan favorite at shows. It was also the first song Maya and Oliver sang together back in 2010, making its inclusion on Best Medicine a moment in which the bands journey from a Lancaster basement to the stages of some of the most well-known festivals in the country seems to have come full circle. The album is also the first one to include a song co-written by Maya and Oliver, who normally write separately: the poignant Feathers and Bone, a song that the pair finished in the studio late one night after one of their recording sessions.

Many of the songs on Best Medicine have been refined onstage in the last year; however, there is one new song that has never been performed live before. Never for Nothing, is an unforgettable ballad that shines with a glimmer of hope as de Vitry sings, over delicate piano and guitar, Im dripping from the rivers I never meant to cross / But I like the things Im learning more than anything Ive lost / And, oh, I have lost‚¬¦but not for nothing.

Although The Stray Birds choose to focus on folk musics sounds, harmonies, and tones, rather than its tradition of politically-conscious lyrics, Best Medicine includes two songs that would do Pete Seeger proud: Cravens Simple Man, a heartbreaking song, reminiscent of Woody Guthries Dust Bowl ballads, told from the perspective of a down on his luck farmer who prays he wont live to see the next sunrise, and de Vitrys Black Hills, a moody song, anchored by clawhammer banjo, about a dark spot in American history ‚¬ it was inspired by a 2012 National Geographic article titled In the Shadow of Wounded Knee.

While the bulk of the original material for Best Medicine was written with The Stray Birds in mind, the two songs that close the album come from an earlier time but find a home in the hands of the close-knit trio. Cravens aforementioned Simple Man, and de Virys Might Rain‚¬â€the first song she ever wrote‚¬â€ a song for which Muench lays down the bass and picks up the clawhammer banjo in a lulling, old-time inspired arrangement.

Supporting the release of Best Medicine, The Stray Birds are touring for much of 2015 and 2016, bringing their stunning harmonies and lyrics to theaters, venues, and festivals across the country and world, and thankfully to the Renaissance Arts Center Theatre in Kingsport, Tennessee on February 19th.


Special Guest Opener: Amythyst Kiah


Amythyst Kiah is a Southern Gothic, alt-country blues American singer/songwriter that has found a way to fuse traditional roots music with a contemporary style that does not take away from the integrity of the original song, and transforms them into powerful, soulful renditions. Her music has been described as “a brilliant blend of surf rock, soul and grunge that bleeds country“.‚  Amythyst Kiah has been a resident of Johnson City, for nearly a decade now.‚  Most people have a difficult time labelling her sound, but she defines it simply as southern roots music She has been performing in the Tri-Cities and in various parts of Southwest Virginia.

Not only are her influences eclectic, but they span across decades. She draws heavily on Old Time music (Mississippi Sheiks, Son House, Jimmie Rodgers, Olla Belle Reed, Carter Family) and is inspired by vocal stylings of R&B and Country music from the ’50s-’70s (Big Mama Thornton, Sister Rosetta Tharpe, Mahalia Jackson, Dolly Parton, Patsy Cline, Loretta Lynn). She also draws heavily from contemporary artists that `have similar powerful vocal integrity (Adele, Florence and the Machine, Megan Jean and the KFB, Janelle Monae, Bonnie Raitt).

Her sound on her new album, Dig, is raw and sparse, with heavy lyrical content regarding such themes as loss, betrayal, and murder.

She has opened for such acts as Tim O’Brien and Darrell Scott, The Duhks, Megan Jean and the KFB, and has played the Smithsonian Folk Life Festival 2012 alongside the Ebony Hillbillies and Sparky and Rhonda Rucker. She also had the pleasure of performing on Music City Roots.

Needless to say, Amythyst has a lot of tools in her vocal tool box, and is also well on her way to joining the powerhouse vocalist pantheon.


The Full Engage Kingsport Performing Arts Series Winter Lineup Includes:
– Friday, January 15, 2016 ‚¬ Blue Highway w/ The Loose Strings Band – $25
– Friday, January 22, 2016 ‚¬ Becky Hobbs & EG Kight w/ Lucy Billings – $10
– Friday, January 29, 2016 ‚¬ The Fiddlin Carson Peters Band w/ Jeffrey Benedict – $15
– Friday, February 5, 2016 ‚¬ Rob Ickes & Trey Hensley w/ JP Parsons – $15
– Friday, February 19, 2016 ‚¬ The Stray Birds w/ Amythyst Kiah – $15
– Friday, February 26, 2016 ‚¬ The Barebart Movement w/ Rebecca Lee Daniels – $15


City of Kingsport Mission:
To provide economic, educational & quality of life opportunities that create a safe, vibrant & diverse Community.

The Office of Cultural Arts, part of the City of Kingsport, connects, coordinates and engages the public with a creative community.

Programs & partnerships include: Art in the Heart Gallery, Public Art Kingsport, The Engage Kingsport Performing Arts Series, the Kingsport Carousel, the Carousel Fine Craft Show and more. These programs and parnerships provide a broad range of support to the areas arts organizations.‚  Each work in tandem with Engage Kingsport, Inc., the Friends of the Cultural Arts group, a private, volunteer-led 501(c)3 non-profit community organization.

http://www.EngageKingsport.com

sullivan1

KINGSPORTOn December 22, 2015, City officials celebrated the reopening of West Sullivan Street with a ceremony removing of the barricades ‚¬ just in time for Christmas.

Its a wonderful holiday present to our community, said Mayor John Clark. Im so proud of City staff for once again delivering a first-class project on time and within budget. Id like to recognize the staff project team for successfully designing and constructing this $1.67 million project.‚  They are Michael Thompson, Jacob Grieb, Chris Alley and Keith Davis.

West Sullivan Street was the original Knoxville Highway. Since its original construction nearly 100 years ago, there has not been much more than routine maintenance.‚  As traffic increased, turn lanes were painted at key intersections to relieve bottlenecks, but the roadway was never widened.

The Sullivan Street project was intended to improve the access and safety of those traveling between Lynn Garden Drive (State Route 36) and Center Street (also State Route 36).‚  Criteria used to determine the need for construction included traffic flow improvement, mobility/access improvement, environmental impact, economic redevelopment, cost, safety improvement, public support, residential disruption and active transportation enhancement.

Phase 1 improved the intersection of Clinchfield and Sullivan Street and replaced two aging traffic signals.‚ Phase 1 was completed in December 2013.

During Phase 2, the existing road was widened for the needed three lanes to provide access to the residential and commercial uses along the road.‚ The new roadway provides adequate room for three lanes.‚ The roadway provides a vital link around the edge of downtown.

The Sullivan Street project included upgraded water lines and storm lines, widening of the sidewalk on the north side of the road, and the addition of a sidewalk along the south side.‚  Overhead utilities were put underground to provide aesthetic improvements, and decorative light poles now illuminate the street and sidewalks.

City staff and BMA continue to prioritize local road improvements based on factors such as safety, economic impact, and return on investment.‚  With the completion of Sullivan St, were turning our attention to Main Street, completing the last remaining section of Rock Springs Road, and replacing the Fort Robinson Bridge, said Fleming.

Concert3

WHEN: Friday February 5, 2016 at 7:30 pm
WHERE: Renaissance Arts Center Theatre in Kingsport, Tennessee
COST: Reserved Seats $15‚ ‚ ‚ ‚ 
BOOK NOW: http://www.EngageKingsport.com (423) 392-8414

KINGSPORT – The Kingsport Office of Cultural Arts and Engage Kingsport present an evening with Rob Ickes & Trey Hensley and special guest JP Parsons on Friday, February 5, 2016 at the Renaissance Arts Center Theatre in Kingsport.

Tickets are $15. This show is part of The Engage Kingsport Performing Arts Series 2016. Engage Kingsport Performing Arts Series shows feature reserved seating in the Renaissance Arts Center Theatre, a 350 seat theatre.

Tickets are available online at EngageKingsport.com or at the Office of Cultural Arts at 1200 E. Center Street, Kingsport or by phone at (423) 392-8414.

Rob Ickes & Trey Hensley:

This unique collaborative effort between two uniquely gifted musicians is bound to be a revelation to traditional music fans on several counts. Rob Ickes is a longtime, well-established instrumental giant, and Trey Hensley is newly arrived in Music City, bursting with talent both as a vocalist and guitarist. Their new album, Before the Sun Goes Dow, was nominated for a GRAMMY Award on December 7, 2015 in the category of Best Bluegrass Album of the Year. The awards will be held on February 15th at the Staples Center in Los Angeles.

From his powerful yet sympathetic vocal interpretations of traditional and contemporary material to his jaw-dropping instrumental skills on both acoustic and electric guitar and considerable songwriting talents, Trey Hensley is bursting at the seams with freshness and musical excitement. His resonant baritone voice is rich, expressive, and equally at ease with classic bluegrass, traditional country, and original compositions. Raised in Jonesborough, Tennessee, Trey began playing guitar and singing when he was 10 years old. Invited by Marty Stuart and joined from the wings by Earl Scruggs, Trey Hensley landed on the Grand Old Opry when
he was only 11. To this day, Marty Stuart remains a fan and booster. Trey has already in his young life played with Johnny and June Carter Cash, Charlie Daniels, Ricky Skaggs, Steve Wariner, The Oak Ridge Boys ,and Janie Fricke. Hes appeared on bills with Sara Evans , Charlie Daniels, Peter Frampton, Randy Owen, Steve Wariner, and Marty Stuart, and has appeared before President George W. Bush, First Lady Laura Bush and Vice President Cheney.

Rob Ickes has been playing bluegrass with his much-decorated band Blue Highway for over twenty years, during which time he has been adjudged Bluegrass Dobro Player Of the year fifteen times. Rob has played on countless sessions, recording with artists such as Merle Haggard, Dierks Bentley, Patty Loveless, and Alison Krauss. He has also helped form a jazz ‚¬oriented trio, Three Ring Circle, along with Andy Leftwich and Dave Pomeroy. His most recent album Three Bells is a true dobro summit, collaborating with fellow greats Jerry Douglas and the late Mike Auldridge. He even once received a surprise phone call from admirer, jazz guitar and harmonica master Toots Thielemans! In Before the Sun Goes Down, the listener will have the chance to view Rob Ickes, by now an acknowledged master of the dobro and lap steel guitar, outside of the box.

Rob has been a supporter since he first heard Trey, a happening that came about in an unusual way. He became aware of the young mans enormous vocal talent when he heard his scratch vocal (suggested by the albums engineer) on Robs band Blue Highways album The Game. Wayne Taylor and Tim Stafford of Blue Highway penned the song My Last Day In The Mine. The band had initially hoped to have a prominent lead singer outside the band to perform a guest vocal of the song for the album but found themselves falling in love with the youthful Treys evocation of the world-weary working mans fears of leaving the only job hed ever known. Trey was 22 at the time. Treys vocal was used on the completed product and has since received considerable positive notice, as has the entire album. Shortly thereafter, Trey and his wife Amber relocated to Nashville, and Rob has been showing Trey the ropes.

Before the Sun Goes Down promises to be a breath of fresh air on the country music scene today while bringing traditional country and bluegrass music to the forefront. Accompanied by some of the finest, most accomplished musicians in Nashville , Rob and Trey tackle a diverse group of songs, put a fresh spin on some old ones, polish up some more recent hits, and offer up an original from Trey ‚¬ all the while drawing influence from artists as diverse as Jimmy Martin, Merle Haggard, Waylon Jennings, Billy Joe Shaver, Bill Monroe, Lester Flatt & Earl Scruggs, Buddy Emmons, Jimmie Rodgers, and Bob Wills. In addition to Rob, Treys sterling vocals are bolstered by a band which includes Aubrey Haynie or Andy Leftwich on fiddle, the ubiquitous (and mighty fine) Nashville acoustic bassist Mike Bub, and drummer John Gardner. Others featured are Jon Randall, Susanne Cox, Dan Tyminski, Shawn Lane, and Ron Block.

Before the Sun Goes Down was recorded mostly live with minimal overdubs, fixes, punch-ins, or even very many takes, and with all the musicians in one room in only a few days of studio time. Rob, the driving force behind the album and the man largely responsible for its creation, says that his favorite albums by the pioneers of the music, the ones that made him want to make music in the first place, were made in the same manner. The spontaneity and sheer joy of creation among a small group of master musicians is palpable in listening to the completed product.

For more about Rob Ickes visit www.RobIckes.com

For more about Trey Hensley visit www.TreyHensley.com

“I’m sure I don’t make a true ‘critic’ since I’m already such a fan, but this album from Rob Ickes and Trey Hensley is a wonderful piece of work. And my songwriting side is truly overwhelmed. Thank you, thank you, thank you.” Merle Haggard

“In the ever changing world of country music, it’s comforting to know that the real deal still exists.”Marty Stuart

It’s right in my wheel house…love it! ‚¬ Bill Cody, WSM Radio

This is just damn good playing. ‚¬ Bluegrass Situation

Special Guest Opener:‚ ‚  JP Parsons


Hailed by Pick Bristol as “Bristol’s own troubadour,” Bristol, Virginia native JP Parsons is no stranger to the music scene; he has been a local favorite for years.

Since his debut CD Appalachian Travels in August of 2012 he has been well received as a regional songwriting sensation.

With his unique, gripping voice, and soulful lyrics, Parsons’ music will please your ears while taking you along the journey with him.


The Full Engage Kingsport Performing Arts Series Winter Lineup Includes:
– Friday, January 15, 2016 ‚¬ Blue Highway w/ The Loose Strings Band – $25
– Friday, January 22, 2016 ‚¬ Becky Hobbs & EG Kight w/ Lucy Billings – $10
– Friday, January 29, 2016 ‚¬ The Fiddlin Carson Peters Band w/ Jeffrey Benedict – $15
– Friday, February 5, 2016 ‚¬ Rob Ickes & Trey Hensley w/ JP Parsons – $15
– Friday, February 19, 2016 ‚¬ The Stray Birds w/ Amythyst Kiah – $15
– Friday, February 26, 2016 ‚¬ The Barebart Movement w/ Rebecca Lee Daniels – $15


City of Kingsport Mission:
To provide economic, educational & quality of life opportunities that create a safe, vibrant & diverse Community.

The Office of Cultural Arts, part of the City of Kingsport, connects, coordinates and engages the public with a creative community.

Programs & partnerships include: Art in the Heart Gallery, Public Art Kingsport, The Engage Kingsport Performing Arts Series, the Kingsport Carousel, the Carousel Fine Craft Show and more. These programs and parnerships provide a broad range of support to the areas arts organizations.‚  Each work in tandem with Engage Kingsport, Inc., the Friends of the Cultural Arts group, a private, volunteer-led 501(c)3 non-profit community organization.

http://www.EngageKingsport.com

Kingsport Police Department

200 Shelby Street • Kingsport, TN 37660

ThomasMPatton • 423-229-9433 (Desk) • 423-224-2786 (FAX)

http://Police.KingsportTN.govwww.KingsportPDBlog.com

NEWS RELEASE
SUBJECT: K.P.D. Detectives Request Assistance in Identifying Tool Thief
DATE: December 22, 2015
CASE #: 15-026091
GENERAL NARRATIVE
On November 12, 2015 at approximately 7:45 PM, a white male suspect entered Lowe’s, located at 2324 West Stone Drive in Kingsport. He grabbed two DeWALT power tool combo packs and a DeWALT hammer drill (total value over $1,000) and ran out of the store with the items without paying. Customer witnesses reported that he either fled in a white or charcoal colored vehicle.

The incident was recorded by store surveillance cameras, and several photographs taken from that footage have been included in this release. A clip of the actual surveillance video has been made available for viewing on the K.P.D. YouTube channel via the link below:

https://youtu.be/rPlmx26XZwc

Anyone who recognizes him is asked to contact Detectives in the K.P.D. Criminal Investigations Division at 423-229-9429 or call Kingsport Central Dispatch at 423-246-9111.

Alternatively, if an individual who is able to supply information related to this or any other case wishes not to be identified, tips can be submitted anonymously via online “Citizen Feedback” forms available at the following link:

http://police.KingsportTN.gov/Citizen_Feedback

RELEASING OFFICER
Thomas M. Patton, Public Information Officer

Kingsport Police Department Professional Standards Unit

Kingsport Police Department

200 Shelby Street • Kingsport, TN 37660

ThomasMPatton • 423-229-9433 (Desk) • 423-224-2786 (FAX)

http://Police.KingsportTN.govwww.KingsportPDBlog.com

NEWS RELEASE
SUBJECT: Kingsport Police Arrest Con Artist for Burglary and Theft
DATE: December 21, 2015
CASE #: 15-027092

15-027145

15-027150

15-027168

GENERAL NARRATIVE
On December 21, 2015 at approximately 9:45 AM, Allen G. Begley was located at 2020 East Center Street, Apartment #5, and arrested on the K.P.D. warrant without incident. Further investigation has revealed that he was also wanted on an outstanding Sullivan County warrant for Violation of Probation.

He was transported to the Kingsport City Jail where he was confined pending arraignment. K.P.D. Detectives are continuing to investigate these and other incidents where Mr. Begley has potentially targeted other citizens.

As previously released:

Kingsport Police Detectives are searching for a suspect, wanted in connection to several recent scam, theft, and burglary complaints throughout the city.

On December 14, 2015 at approximately 3:00 PM, an individual purporting to be “Earl Ritchie” went to a residence on Celtic Court in Kingsport. He entered an open garage and knocked on an interior door of the home, asking the homeowner if he had any odd jobs that he could do for money. The homeowner declined the offer; however, after the individual left, two chainsaws were discovered to be missing. “Earl Ritchie” has since been positively identified as actually being Allen G. Begley.

On December 15, 2015 at approximately 5:00 PM, Mr. Begley went to a residence on Freeman Drive, asking for money or work, and again claiming to be “Earl Ritchie.” He was allowed into the residence by the homeowner. While inside, he managed to take a garage door opener allowing him access to a detached garage. After he left, several power tools were found to have been stolen from the garage.

K.P.D. has also received complaints from two residents on Carters Valley Road where Mr. Begley came to their homes, begging for money and asking for work, and claiming to be “Earl Ritchie.” Detectives have also received reports that Mr. Begley may be trying to sell some of the stolen items for profit.

K.P.D. has received further complaints from patrons of Lowe’s on East Stone Drive involving the same individual soliciting money. Mr. Begley has been traveling in a late 1990s black Honda in the company of a female.

Detectives have obtained a felony warrant, charging Mr. Begley with Burglary and Theft over $500. Two photographs of Mr. Begley have been included in this release. While he looks distinctly different in the two photos, they are indeed of the same individual. Anyone who knows where he can be located is asked to contact Detectives in the K.P.D. Criminal Investigations Division at 423-229-9429 or call Kingsport Central Dispatch at 423-246-9111.

Alternatively, if an individual who is able to supply information related to this or any other case wishes not to be identified, tips can be submitted anonymously via online “Citizen Feedback” forms available at the following link:

http://police.KingsportTN.gov/Citizen_Feedback

Citizens are urged to always use caution when approached at home or in public by strangers soliciting money or work. Their story may appear believable on its surface; however, their intentions may turn out to be more sinister in nature.

SUSPECT INFORMATION
Name Allen G. Begley (alias Earl Ritchie)
Age Date of Birth 8/27/1989

26 Years of Age

Gender/Race Male/White
Residency 2020 East Center Street, Apartment #5

Kingsport, TN

Charge(s) 1) Burglary

2) Theft over $500

RELEASING OFFICER
Thomas M. Patton, Public Information Officer

Kingsport Police Department Professional Standards Unit

KFD_News_72

KINGSPORT – For most of us, the holiday season represents a time for family festivities and good cheer. What few of us consider is that the holiday season is a time when there is an increased risk of home fires. According to the Kingsport Fire Department, many households engage in holiday activities that serve as some of the leading causes of U.S. home fires, including cooking. Christmas trees, candle usage and holiday decorations also significantly contribute to the seasonal causes of home fires. Add to that the hectic nature of the holidays, when people are trying to accomplish multiple tasks at one time, and the chance for home fires grows even more.

As everyone gets busier during the holidays, we often become rushed, distracted or tired, says Barry Brickey, Public Education Officer of the Kingsport Fire Department. Thats when home fires are more likely to occur.

Fortunately, with a little added awareness and some minor adjustments to holiday cooking and decorating, the season can remain festive and safe for everybody. By taking some preventive steps and following simple rules of thumb, most home fires can be prevented, says Barry Brickey.

With unattended cooking as the leading cause of U.S. home fires and home fire injuries, Barry Brickey says to stay in the kitchen while youre frying, grilling, boiling, or broiling bard. Most cooking fires involve the stovetop, so keep anything that can catch fire away from it, and turn off the stove when you leave the kitchen, even if its for a short period of time. If youre simmering, baking or roasting bard, check it regularly and use a timer to remind you that youre cooking.‚  The Kingsport Fire Department also suggests creating a kid-free zone of at least three feet around the stove and areas where hot bard and drinks are prepared or carried.

Candles are widely used in homes throughout the holidays, and December is the peak month for home candle fires. The nonprofit National Fire Protection Associations (NFPA) statistics show that two of every five home decoration fires are started by candles. The Kingsport Fire Department encourages residents to consider using flameless candles, which look and smell like real candles. However, if you do use traditional candles, keep them at least 12 away from anything that can burn, and remember to blow them out when you leave the room or go to bed. Use candle holders that are sturdy, wont tip over and are placed on uncluttered surfaces. Avoid using candles in the bedroom where more than one-third of U.S. candle fires begin or other areas where people may fall asleep. Lastly, never leave a child or pet alone in a room with a burning candle.

According to NFPA, U.S. fire departments respond to an average of 210 home structure fires caused by Christmas trees per year. Three of every ten of them is caused by electrical problems, and one in four result from a heat source thats too close to the tree. The Kingsport Fire Department offers the following advice for picking, placing and lighting the tree:

If you have an artificial tree, be sure its labeled, certified or identified by the manufacturer as fire-retardant.

If you choose a fresh tree, make sure the green needles dont fall off when touched; before placing it in the stand, cut 2 from the base of the trunk. Add water to the tree stand, and be sure to water it daily.

Make sure the tree is not blocking an exit, and is at least three feet away from any heat source, like fireplaces, space heaters, radiators, candles and heat vents or lights.

Use lights that have the label of a recognized testing laboratory, and make sure you know whether they are designed for indoor or outdoor use.

Replace any string of lights with worn or broken cords, or loose bulb connections. Read manufacturers instructions for number of light strands to connect.

Never use lit candles to decorate the tree.

Always turn off Christmas tree lights before leaving the home or going to bed.

After Christmas, get rid of the tree. Dried-out trees are a fire hazard and should not be left in the home or garage, or placed outside the home. Kingsport residents can place their tree at the curb for recycle.

Bring outdoor electrical lights inside after the holidays to prevent hazards and make them last longer.

By following these fire prevention tips and measures, The Kingsport Fire Department says you can greatly reduce the risk of fire in your home, and enjoy a safe holiday season. The holidays can quickly turn from joyful to tragic when a fire occurs, says Barry Brickey. By taking simple precautions, people can avoid potential fire hazards, and make this time of year a healthy and happy one.

Hard to Buy For Gift Ideas:

Smoke Alarms with long life batteries

Kitchen Fire Extinguisher

Escape Ladder for the bedroom

Visit www.nfpa.org/holiday for more information and safety tips.

The Kingsport Board of Mayor and Alderman will hold a Regular Business meeting at 7:00pm in the Court Room in City Hall, located at 225 W. Center Street, Kingsport, TN. For more information please call Anne Adamson at 423.229.9400.

The Kingsport Board of Mayor and Alderman will hold a Regular Business meeting at 7:00pm in the Court Room in City Hall, located at 225 W. Center Street, Kingsport, TN. For more information please call Anne Adamson at 423.229.9400.