Apartment Fire In Kingsport

December 3, 2015

At 6:46am, Engines 1, 12, 2, 4, 8, 5,and 3, Ladder 1, and C-3 from the Kingsport Fire Department responded to a structure fire at Maple Oak Apartments, 818 Oak St, apartment 124. KFD Firefighters found smoke emitting from a first floor apartment of the 3 story building. Firefighters were able extinguish the fire within 5-10 minutes of arrival and contain it to one apartment. The fire damaged a bathroom, with smoke damage throughout the rest of the apartment. Two residents of the complex were transported to the hospital. The occupant of the apartment was not injured. According to the Kingsport Fire Marshal’s Office the cause of the fire was undetermined.

The Kingsport Fire Department offers these cold weather fire safety tips:
Heating Safety
• Use kerosene heaters and space heaters according to the manufacturer’s instructions.
• Alternative heaters need their space. Keep anything combustible at least three feet away.
• Make sure your alternative heaters have ‘tip switches.’ These ‘tip switches’ are designed to automatically turn off the heater in the event they tip over.
• Do not use the kitchen oven range to heat your home. In addition to being a fire hazard, it can be a source of toxic fumes.
• Never refill a space heater while it is operating or still hot.
• Refuel heaters only outdoors.
• Make sure wood stoves are properly installed, and at least three feet away from combustible materials. Ensure they have the proper floor support and adequate ventilation.
• Ensure that your carbon monoxide alarm is working.
Generator Safety
• Follow the manufacturer’s instructions and guidelines when using generators.
• Use a generator or other fuel-powered machines outside the home. CO fumes are odorless and can quickly overwhelm you indoors.
• Use the appropriate sized and type power cords to carry the electric load. Overloaded cords can overheat and cause fires.
• Never run cords under rugs or carpets where heat might build up or damage to a cord may go unnoticed.
• Never connect generators to another power source such as power lines. The reverse flow of electricity or ‘backfeed’ can electrocute an unsuspecting utility worker.
Electrical Safety
• If your home has sustained flood or water damage, and you can safely get to the main breaker or fuse box, turn off the power.
• Assume all wires on the ground are electrically charged. This includes cable TV feeds.
• Look for and replace frayed or cracked extension and appliance cords, loose prongs, and plugs.
• Exposed outlets and wiring could present a fire and life safety hazard.
• Appliances that emit smoke or sparks should be repaired or replaced.
• Have a licensed electrician check your home for damage.
Additional Tips
• Be careful when using candles. Keep the flame away from combustible objects and out of the reach of children.
• If the power goes out, make certain that all electrical appliances, such as stoves, electric space heaters and hair dryers, are in the OFF position.
• Make certain that your home’s smoke alarms are in proper working order.
• Some smoke alarms may be dependent on your home’s electrical service and could be inoperative during a power outage. Check to see if your smoke alarm uses a back-up battery and install a new battery at least twice a year.
• Smoke alarms should be installed on every level of your home and inside and outside of sleeping areas.
• All smoke alarms should be tested monthly. All batteries should be replaced with new ones at least twice a year.
• If your smoke alarms are over ten years old they need to be replaced with Dual Sensor Smoke Alarms with long life batteries.
• If there is a fire hydrant near your home, keep it clear of snow, ice and debris for easy access by the fire department.
For more safety tips got to http://www.nfpa.org/safety-information/for-consumers/holidays/put-a-freeze-on-winter-fires

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Kingsport Fire Department: Thanksgiving Safety

For most, the kitchen is the heart of the home, especially during the holidays. From testing family recipes to decorating cakes and cookies, everyone enjoys being part of the preparations. So keeping fire safety top of mind in the kitchen during this joyous but hectic time is important, especially when there’s a lot of activity and people at home. “Three times as many cooking fires happen on Thanksgiving Day, with extra family members in your home, make sure everyone knows your fire escape plan, and families should be extra cautious and not leave your cooking unattended.” Stated Barry Brickey Public Education Officer for the Kingsport Fire Department.

As you start preparing your holiday schedule and organizing that large family feast, remember, by following a few simple safety tips you can enjoy time with your loved ones and keep yourself and your family safer from fire.

Safety tips

  • Stay in the kitchen when you are cooking on the stovetop so you can keep an eye on the food.
  • Stay in the home when cooking your turkey and check on it frequently.
  • Keep children away from the stove. The stove will be hot and kids should stay 3 feet away.
  • Make sure kids stay away from hot food and liquids. The steam or splash from vegetables, gravy or coffee could cause serious burns.
  • Keep the floor clear so you don’t trip over kids, toys, pocketbooks or bags.
  • Keep knives out of the reach of children.
  • Be sure electric cords from an electric knife, coffee maker, plate warmer or mixer are not dangling off the counter within easy reach of a child.
  • Keep matches and utility lighters out of the reach of children — up high in a locked cabinet.
  • Never leave children alone in room with a lit candle.
  • Make sure your smoke alarms are working. Test them by pushing the test button.
Thanksgiving by the numbers
  • In 2013, Thanksgiving Day (November 28) was the leading date for home cooking fires with 1,550, 230% above the average number of fires per day.
  • Thanksgiving is the peak day for home cooking fires, followed by Christmas Day and Christmas Eve.
  • Unattended cooking was by far the leading contributing factor in cooking fires and fire deaths.
  • Cooking equipment is the leading cause of home structure fires and associated civilian injuries and was the third leading cause of home fire deaths
  • -Source nfpa.org

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Children from Shoemaker Elementary School in Gate City, VA Visited Station 1 to learn about Fire Safety.

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With temperatures headed below freezing over the weekend, the risk for home fires increases. However, many of these fires are preventable, and you can reduce their risks of becoming a fire casualty by identifying potential hazards and following simple safety tips.

“Extreme cold increases the risk of residential fires.” said Barry Brickey Public Education Officer for the Kingsport Fire Department. “Alternate heating and cooking sources also increase the chance of fire. By following some basic safety tips, you can protect yourself and your family when severe weather strikes.”

The Kingsport Fire Department offers these cold weather tips:

Heating Safety

  • Use kerosene heaters and space heaters according to the manufacturer’s instructions.
  • Alternative heaters need their space. Keep anything combustible at least three feet away.
  • Make sure your alternative heaters have ‘tip switches.’ These ‘tip switches’ are designed to automatically turn off the heater in the event they tip over.
  • Do not use the kitchen oven range to heat your home. In addition to being a fire hazard, it can be a source of toxic fumes.
  • Never refill a space heater while it is operating or still hot.
  • Refuel heaters only outdoors.
  • Make sure wood stoves are properly installed, and at least three feet away from combustible materials. Ensure they have the proper floor support and adequate ventilation.
  • Ensure that your carbon monoxide alarm is working.

Generator Safety

  • Follow the manufacturer’s instructions and guidelines when using generators.
  • Use a generator or other fuel-powered machines outside the home. CO fumes are odorless and can quickly overwhelm you indoors.
  • Use the appropriate sized and type power cords to carry the electric load. Overloaded cords can overheat and cause fires.
  • Never run cords under rugs or carpets where heat might build up or damage to a cord may go unnoticed.
  • Never connect generators to another power source such as power lines. The reverse flow of electricity or ‘backfeed’ can electrocute an unsuspecting utility worker.

Electrical Safety

  • If your home has sustained flood or water damage, and you can safely get to the main breaker or fuse box, turn off the power.
  • Assume all wires on the ground are electrically charged. This includes cable TV feeds.
  • Look for and replace frayed or cracked extension and appliance cords, loose prongs, and plugs.
  • Exposed outlets and wiring could present a fire and life safety hazard.
  • Appliances that emit smoke or sparks should be repaired or replaced.
  • Have a licensed electrician check your home for damage.

Additional Tips

  • Be careful when using candles. Keep the flame away from combustible objects and out of the reach of children.
  • If the power goes out, make certain that all electrical appliances, such as stoves, electric space heaters and hair dryers, are in the OFF position.
  • Make certain that your home’s smoke alarms are in proper working order.
  • Some smoke alarms may be dependent on your home’s electrical service and could be inoperative during a power outage. Check to see if your smoke alarm uses a back-up battery and install a new battery at least twice a year.
  • Smoke alarms should be installed on every level of your home and inside and outside of sleeping areas.
  • All smoke alarms should be tested monthly. All batteries should be replaced with new ones at least twice a year.
  • If your smoke alarms are over ten years old they need to be replaced with Dual Sensor Smoke Alarms with long life batteries.
  • If there is a fire hydrant near your home, keep it clear of snow, ice and debris for easy access by the fire department.

For more safety tips got to http://www.nfpa.org/safety-information/for-consumers/holidays/put-a-freeze-on-winter-fires

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The Kingsport Fire Department Reminds Area Residents:

Hear the Beep Where You Sleep. Every Bedroom Needs a Working Smoke Alarm!

 

Kingsport, TN – Location matters when it comes to your smoke alarm. That’s the message behind this year’s Fire Prevention Week/Month campaign, “Hear the Beep

Where You Sleep. Every Bedroom Needs a Working Smoke Alarm!”

 

Along with firefighters and safety advocates nationwide, the Kingsport Fire Department is joining forces with the nonprofit National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) during Fire Prevention Week, October 4-10, to remind local residents about the importance of having working smoke alarms in every bedroom, outside each sleeping area, and on every level of the home, including the basement.

 

“In a fire, seconds count,” said Barry Brickey, Public Education Officer for the Kingsport Fire Department. “Half of home fire deaths result from fires reported at night between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m. when most people are asleep. Home smoke alarms can alert people to a fire before it spreads, giving everyone enough time to get out. Smoke Alarms combined with Home Sprinklers Systems are your best defense in case of a fire!”

 

According to the latest NFPA research, working smoke alarms cut the chance of dying in a fire in half. Meanwhile, three out of five fire deaths resulted from fires in homes with no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms. Home Fire Sprinklers will quickly put out or contain a fire before the fire engines arrive.

 

This year’s Fire Prevention Week campaign includes the following smoke alarm messages:

 

  • Install smoke alarms in every bedroom, outside each separate sleeping area and on every level of the home, including the basement.
  • Interconnect all smoke alarms throughout the home. This way, when one sounds, they all do.
  • Test alarms at least monthly by pushing the test button.
  • Replace all smoke alarms when they are 10 years old or sooner if they don’t respond properly.
  • Make sure everyone in the home knows the sound of the smoke alarm and understands what to do when they hear it.
  • If the smoke alarm sounds, get outside and stay outside. Go to your outside meeting place.
  • Call the fire department from outside the home.
  • When building or remodeling a home install Home Fire Sprinklers.

 

The Kingsport Fire Department will be hosting activities during Fire Prevention Week to promote “Hear the Beep Where You Sleep. Every Bedroom Needs a Working Smoke Alarm!” Join Sparky the Fire Dog and a Fire Engine for a story-time at the Kingsport Library on Tuesday, October 6th @ 10:30. Homeschooling families are invited to  attend one of the open Station 1 Tours Oct 13th & 16th @ 10am.

 

Fire Prevention Week has transformed into Fire Prevention Month for October in Kingsport, but activities begin in September and run through November as School visits, Station Tours and Presentations about fire safety fill up the calendar. Through these educational, family-oriented activities, residents can learn more about the importance of having a working smoke alarm in every bedroom. Over 35,000 children and adults participated in Kingsport Fire Department Fire and Life Safety Events in 2014.

 

To find out more about Fire Prevention Week/Month programs and activities in Kingsport, please contact Barry Brickey at the Kingsport Fire Department at 423-229-9440. To learn more about smoke alarms and “Hear the Beep Where You Sleep. Every Bedroom Needs a Working Smoke Alarm!” visit NFPA’s Web site at www.firepreventionweek.org and www.sparky.org/fpw.

 

The City of Kingsport will soon be taking applications for the Kingsport Fire Department (KFD) Rookie Firefighter Candidates. Candidates wishing to apply can do so at www.kingsporttn.gov in the coming months.

The Kingsport Fire Department’s Rookie Firefighter Candidate hiring procedure relies on a multi-step process consisting of  application by the candidate,  a scheduled written exam with a Candidate Physical Ability Test (CPAT) and interviews.

The KFD utilizes the Candidate Physical Ability Test (CPAT) as a benchmark for candidates during the hiring process. Potential applicants are encouraged to review the test information and preparation materials on this website: CPAT link

The Fire Service Joint Labor Management Wellness/Fitness Initiative Candidate Physical Ability Test© consists of eight separate events. The CPAT is a sequence of events requiring the candidate to progress along a predetermined path from event to event in a continuous manner . This test was developed to allow fire departments a means for obtaining pools of trainable candidates who are physically able to perform essential job tasks at fire scenes. CPAT Video

Kingsport businesses and residents stand to save on insurance costs with increased Kingsport ISO fire rating

KINGSPORT –Kingsport has just become the only Insurance Services Office city rated as Class 2 for fire protection in Northeast Tennessee, moving up from the previous classification of 3/9.

ISO is a leading source of property/casualty insurance risk data. Class 1 is the highest level of fire protection a local government can provide, with 10 indicating little or no fire protection at all.

The class 2 designation will be in effect until the next ISO review in five years and applies only to directly served residents inside the corporate boundaries of the City.

According to Kingsport Fire Department, there are 30,145 fire departments in the USA and 725 fire departments in Tennessee. Only 750 departments nation-wide are rated as Class 2.

“The investments made by the Board of Mayor and Aldermen over the last several years have gone a long way to help improve our ISO Rating from a 3 to a 2,” Fire Chief Craig Dye said Tuesday. “The new rating shows that having a highly trained and well equipped fire department as well as sound infrastructure pays off for our residents, in terms of greater safety, and by saving our citizens and businesses money.”

City Manager Jeff Fleming noted that earning the new ISO rating was an effort that went beyond front-line Fire protection personnel, as the entire system is reviewed, including Central Dispatch, GIS (Geographic Information Services), the Water Department, as well as all those within the Fire Department who provide training, instruction, community inspections.

“I have spoken repeatedly about the tremendous depth of talent we now have on board in City government,” Fleming said. “This is just one example how this high talent level will continue to provide payback for the citizens of our City in the years ahead.”

In particular, both Fleming and Dye said the ISO 2 rating is a result of employee efforts by folks such as Jerry Mowl and Nancy Fender in Central Dispatch, Jake White in GIS, Chad Austin and Chris Alley in the Water Department, as well as Chris Lowe, Max Bear, Todd Greene and Joel Jones in the Fire Department.

While 99 percent of the City is rate as Class 2, the remainder is rated at 2Y, a designation denoting a property that is more than 1,000 foot from a hydrant or more than five miles from a fire station.

ISO ratings are based on a community’s fire-suppression system, communications, fire halls, equipment, and water supply.

Other cities in Tennessee which have earned a Class 2 designation include Chattanooga, Franklin, Murfreesboro, and Memphis. Johnson City and Bristol currently have a Class 3 designation.

It is difficult to quantify the annual insurance savings for business and residences, with each insurer using differing methodologies and criteria. Still, Fleming said each citizen should speak with their insurer to ensure they are being charged based on the new ISO classification. Based on previous studies, the savings could be as much as $300 a year.

“This is a big win for our community, and certainly, we encourage our business owners and homeowners to look into the potential insurance savings from this new rating classification,” Fleming said.

October is Fire Prevention Month in Kingsport

Your home should be a safe haven. But do you regularly check your smoke alarms? If not, there is the potential for danger. That’s why the Kingsport Fire Department is teaming up with NFPA for Fire Prevention Week and all of October to remind residents that “Working Smoke Alarms Save Lives, Test Yours Every Month!”

  • Almost three of five (60%) of reported home fire deaths in 2007 to 2011 resulted from fires in homes with no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms.
  • Working smoke alarms cut the risk of dying in reported home fires in half.
  • In fires considered large enough to activate the smoke alarm, hardwired alarms operated 93% of the time, while battery powered alarms operated only 79% of the time.
  • When smoke alarms fail to operate, it is usually because batteries are missing, disconnected, or dead.
  • An ionization smoke alarm is generally more responsive to flaming fires and a photoelectric smoke alarm is generally more responsive to smoldering fires. For the best protection, or where extra time is needed, to awaken or assist others, both types of alarms, or combination ionization and photoelectric alarms are recommended.
  • Additionally residents are urged learn how to plan and practice escape from a home in case a fire occurs.

 

The History of Fire Prevention Week

Fire Prevention Week was established to commemorate the Great Chicago Fire, the tragic 1871 conflagration that killed more than 250 people, left 100,000 homeless, destroyed more than 17,400 structures and burned more than 2,000 acres. The fire began on October 8, but continued into and did most of its damage on October 9, 1871.

Commemorating a conflagration
According to popular legend, the fire broke out after a cow – belonging to Mrs. Catherine O’Leary – kicked over a lamp, setting first the barn, then the whole city on fire. Chances are you’ve heard some version of this story yourself; people have been blaming the Great Chicago Fire on the cow and Mrs. O’Leary, for more than 130 years. But recent research by Chicago historian Robert Cromie has helped to debunk this version of events.

But if a cow wasn’t to blame for the huge fire, what was? Over the years, journalists and historians have offered plenty of theories. Some blamed the blaze on a couple of neighborhood boys who were near the barn sneaking cigarettes. Others believed that a neighbor of the O’Leary’s may have started the fire. Some people have speculated that a fiery meteorite may have fallen to earth on October 8, starting several fires that day – in Michigan and Wisconsin, as well as in Chicago.

The biggest blaze that week
While the Great Chicago Fire was the best-known blaze to start during this fiery two-day stretch, it wasn’t the biggest. That distinction goes to the Peshtigo Fire, the most devastating forest fire in American history. The fire, which also occurred on October 8th, 1871, and roared through Northeast Wisconsin, burning down 16 towns, killing 1,152 people, and scorching 1.2 million acres before it ended.

Historical accounts of the fire say that the blaze began when several railroad workers clearing land for tracks unintentionally started a brush fire. Before long, the fast-moving flames were whipping through the area ‘like a tornado,’ some survivors said. It was the small town of Peshtigo, Wisconsin that suffered the worst damage. Within an hour, the entire town had been destroyed.

Nine decades of fire prevention
Those who survived the Chicago and Peshtigo fires never forgot what they’d been through; both blazes produced countless tales of bravery and heroism. But the fires also changed the way that firefighters and public officials thought about fire safety. On the 40th anniversary of the Great Chicago Fire, the Fire Marshals Association of North America (today known as the International Fire Marshals Association), decided that the anniversary of the Great Chicago Fire should henceforth be observed not with festivities, but in a way that would keep the public informed about the importance of fire prevention.  The commemoration grew incrementally official over the years.

In 1920, President Woodrow Wilson issued the first National Fire Prevention Day proclamation, and since 1922, Fire Prevention Week has been observed on the Sunday through Saturday period in which October 9 falls. According to the National Archives and Records Administration’s Library Information Center, Fire Prevention Week is the longest running public health and safety observance on record. The President of the United States has signed a proclamation proclaiming a national observance during that week every year since 1925.

 

Home Fire Safety Tips and Facts:

Home fires

  • In 2011, U.S. fire departments responded to 370,000 home structure fires. These fires caused 13,910 civilian injuries, 2,520 civilian deaths, $6.9 billion in direct damage.
  • On average, seven people died in U.S. home fires per day from 2007 to 2011.
  • Cooking is the leading cause home fires and home fire injuries, followed heating equipment.
  • Smoking is a leading cause of civilian home fire deaths.
  • Most fatal fires kill one or two people. In 2012, 8 home fires killed five or more people resulting in a total of 44 deaths.
  • According to an NFPA survey, only one-third of Americans have both developed and practiced a home fire escape plan.
  • Almost three-quarters of Americans do have an escape plan; however, more than half never practiced it.
  • One-third (32%) of respondents who made an estimate thought they would have at least 6 minutes before a fire in their home would become life threatening. The time available is often less. Only 8% said their first thought on hearing a smoke alarm would be to get out!
  • During 2007-2011 candles caused 3% of home fires, 4% of home fire deaths, 7% of home fire injuries and 6% of direct property damage from home fires.
  • On average, there are 32 home candle fires reported per day.
  • More than one-third of these fires (36%) started in the bedroom; however, the candle industry found that only 13% of candle users burn candles in the bedroom most often.
  • Nearly three in five candle fires (56%) start when things that can burn are too close to the candle.

Escape Planning

  • According to an NFPA survey, only one-third of Americans have both developed and practiced a home fire escape plan.
  • Almost three-quarters of Americans do have an escape plan; however, more than half never practiced it.
  • One-third (32%) of respondents who made an estimate thought they would have at least 6 minutes before a fire in their home would become life threatening. The time available is often less. Only 8% said their first thought on hearing a smoke alarm would be to get out!

Cooking

  • U.S. Fire Departments responded to an estimated annual average of 156,600 cooking-related fires between 2007-2011, resulting in 400 civilian deaths, 5,080 civilian injuries and $853 million in direct damage.
  • Two of every five home fires started in the kitchen.
  • Unattended cooking was a factor in 34% of reported home cooking fires.
  • Two-thirds of home cooking fires started with ignition of food or other cooking materials.
  • Ranges accounted for the 57% of home cooking fire incidents. Ovens accounted for 16%.
  • Children under five face a higher risk of non-fire burns associated with cooking and hot food and drinks than being burned in a cooking fire.
  • Microwave ovens are one of the leading home products associated with scald burn injuries not related to fires. According to the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System, two out of five of the microwave oven injuries seen at emergency rooms in 2011 were scald burns.
  • Clothing was the item first ignited in less than 1% of home cooking fires, but these incidents accounted for 15% of the cooking fire deaths.

Heating

  • The leading factor contributing to heating equipment fires was failure to clean, principally creosote from solid fueled heating equipment, primarily chimneys.
  • Portable or fixed space heaters, including wood stoves, were involved in one-third (33%) of home heating fires and four out of five (81%) home heating deaths.
  • Half of home heating fire deaths resulted from fires caused by heating equipment too close to things that can burn, such as upholstered furniture, clothing, mattresses or bedding.
  • In most years, heating equipment is the second leading cause of home fires, fire deaths, and fire injuries.
  • Fixed or portable space heaters are involved in about 4 out of 5 heating fire deaths.

Smoking materials

  • During 2007-2011 smoking materials caused an estimated 17,900 home structure fires, resulting in 580 deaths, 1,280 injuries and $509 million in direct property damage, per year.
  • Sleep was a factor in 31% of the home smoking material fire deaths.
  • Possible alcohol impairment was a factor in one in five (18%) of home smoking fire deaths.
  • In recent years, Canada and the United States have required that all cigarettes sold must be “fire safe,” that is have reduced ignition strength and less likely to start fires.

Electrical

  • About half (48%) of home electrical fires involved electrical distribution or lighting equipment. Other leading types of equipment were washer or dryer, fan, portable or stationary space heater, air conditioning equipment water heater and range.
  • Electrical failure or malfunctions caused an average of almost 48,000 home fires per year, resulting in roughly 450 deaths and nearly $1.5 billion in direct property damage.

Candles

  • During 2007-2011 candles caused 3% of home fires, 4% of home fire deaths, 7% of home fire injuries and 6% of direct property damage from home fires.
  • On average, there are 32 home candle fires reported per day.
  • More than one-third of these fires (36%) started in the bedroom; however, the candle industry found that only 13% of candle users burn candles in the bedroom most often.
  • Nearly three in five candle fires (56%) start when things that can burn are too close to the candle.
– Reproduced from NFPA’s Fire Prevention Week website, www.firepreventionweek.org. ©2014 NFPA

For more information contact the Kingsport Fire Department’s Public Education Officer Barry Brickey at 423-224-2820

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On July 8th, 2014, children from Washington Elementary visited Fire Station 1 on Island Street. The kids were given a tour of the fire station, enjoyed a puppet show, and Sparky the Fire Dog even made an appearance to teach the children about fire safety.

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On Friday, July 4th, 2014, members of the Kingsport Fire Department Honor Guard led Ladder 1 through the streets of Kingsport during the July 4th Parade. The Kingsport Fire Department Honor Guard presents the colors at a number of events throughout the region during the year.