Posts

San Antonio, TX, August 16, 2016

The Kingsport Fire Department (KFD) received its fourth consecutive designation as an Accredited Agency. Chief Craig Dye and Assistant Chief Scott Boyd presented the Kingsport Fire Department’s submission and received the results of the Commission on Fire Accreditation International (CFAI) review at Fire Rescue International in San Antonio, TX. The hearing culminated a year long process by the Kingsport Fire Department’s Accreditation Team.

The CFAI confers Accredited Agency status for a period of five years, during which an agency must submit four Annual Compliance Reports to demonstrate their continued compliance with core performance indicators and report on progress in executing their plans for improvement. The Commission determines if the reports are acceptable and the agency may retain its accredited status. At the end of the fifth year, an Accredited Agency must seek reaccreditation and successfully complete the peer review process to remain accredited.

Early in 2016, Kingsport Fire Department’s (KFD) Accreditation Committee and members of the Board of Mayor and Alderman met with a Fire Service Peer Assessment Team for review and recommendations toward the KFD’s Accreditation with the Commission on Fire Accreditation International (CFAI).

The Peer Assessment Team consisted of Chief Mike Stallings, Rock Mount (NC) Fire Department (retired), Chief Matt Knott, Rockford (IL) Fire Department, Chief Andrew Ansley, Monroe (NC) Fire Department and Chief Josh Smith, Statesville (NC) Fire Department.

In 2001, Kingsport Fire Department was one of the first 40 Fire Departments in the world to obtain the Commission on Fire Accreditation International designation. In 2006 and 2011 the KFD again awarded the designation. Currently the Kingsport Fire Department is one of only four fire departments in the state of Tennessee and was one of the first 40 in the world recognized as an Accredited Agency through the Center for Public Safety Excellence Commission’s Fire Accreditation International. Brentwood (TN) Fire & Rescue, City of Maryville (TN) Fire Department, and the City of Alcoa Fire Department are the only other agencies in Tennessee to achieve this designation.

Special thanks to the Kingsport Fire Department’s (KFD) Accreditation Committee Members for their hard work:

Chief Craig Dye

Assistant Chief Scott Boyd

Deputy Chief David Chase

Deputy Chief Darrell Hayes

Deputy Chief Jim Everhart

Fire Marshal Robert Sluss

Senior Captain Joel Jones

Captain Max Bear

Captain Jessie Bishop

Captain Chris Lowe

Captain David Mitchell

Captain Ben Wexler

Assistant Fire Marshal Chris Vandagriff

Public Education Officer Barry Brickey

Executive Secretary Alison Shaffer

Center for Public Safety Excellence Mission:
The mission of the Center for Public Safety Excellence is “To lead the fire and emergency service to excellence through the continuous quality improvement process of accreditation, credentialing, and education.”

Accreditation

Accreditation is a comprehensive self-assessment and evaluation model that enables organizations to examine past, current, and future service levels and internal performance and compare them to industry best practices. This process leads to improved service delivery.

CPSE’s Accreditation Program, administered by the Commission on Fire Accreditation International (CFAI) allows fire and emergency service agencies to compare their performance to industry best practices in order to:

  • Determine community risk and safety needs and develop community-specific Standards of Cover.
  • Evaluate the performance of the department.
  • Establish a method for achieving continuous organizational improvement.

Local government executives face increasing pressure to “do more with less” and justify their expenditures by demonstrating a direct link to improved or expanded services. Particularly for emergency services, local officials need criteria to assess professional performance and efficiency. The CFAI accreditation process provides a well-defined, internationally-recognized benchmark system to measure the quality of fire and emergency services.

Kingsport Fire Department (KFD) to Present and Receive Results of the Commission on Fire Accreditation International (CFAI) Review

Tuesday August 16, 2016, 3PM – 4PM

Chief Craig Dye and Assistant Chief Scott Boyd will be San Antonio, TX to present the Kingsport Fire Department’s submission and receive the results of the Commission on Fire Accreditation International (CFAI) review. The hearings will be broadcast over the internet at http://cpse.distancelearningcenter.com. Chief Dye and Assistant Chief Boyd are scheduled to present for Kingsport on Tuesday, August 16, between 3PM – 4PM.  The hearing will culminate a year long process by the Kingsport Fire Department’s Accreditation Team. In 2001, Kingsport Fire Department was one of the first 30 Fire Departments in the world to receive the Commission on Fire Accreditation International designation. In 2006 and 2011 the KFD again received the honor.

The CFAI is part of the Center for Public Safety Excellence (CPSE).

CPSE Mission
The mission of the Center for Public Safety Excellence is “To lead the fire and emergency service to excellence through the continuous quality improvement process of accreditation, credentialing, and education.”

Accreditation

Accreditation is a comprehensive self-assessment and evaluation model that enables organizations to examine past, current, and future service levels and internal performance and compare them to industry best practices. This process leads to improved service delivery.

CPSE’s Accreditation Program, administered by the Commission on Fire Accreditation International (CFAI) allows fire and emergency service agencies to compare their performance to industry best practices in order to:

  • Determine community risk and safety needs and develop community-specific Standards of Cover.
  • Evaluate the performance of the department.
  • Establish a method for achieving continuous organizational improvement.

Local government executives face increasing pressure to “do more with less” and justify their expenditures by demonstrating a direct link to improved or expanded services. Particularly for emergency services, local officials need criteria to assess professional performance and efficiency. The CFAI accreditation process provides a well-defined, internationally-recognized benchmark system to measure the quality of fire and emergency services.

 

The City of Kingsport will soon be taking applications for the Kingsport Fire Department (KFD) Rookie Firefighter Candidates. Candidates wishing to apply can do so at www.kingsporttn.gov in the coming months.

The Kingsport Fire Department’s Rookie Firefighter Candidate hiring procedure relies on a multi-step process consisting of  application by the candidate,  a scheduled written exam with a Candidate Physical Ability Test (CPAT) and interviews.

The KFD utilizes the Candidate Physical Ability Test (CPAT) as a benchmark for candidates during the hiring process. Potential applicants are encouraged to review the test information and preparation materials on this website: CPAT link

The Fire Service Joint Labor Management Wellness/Fitness Initiative Candidate Physical Ability Test© consists of eight separate events. The CPAT is a sequence of events requiring the candidate to progress along a predetermined path from event to event in a continuous manner . This test was developed to allow fire departments a means for obtaining pools of trainable candidates who are physically able to perform essential job tasks at fire scenes. CPAT Video

October is Fire Prevention Month in Kingsport

Your home should be a safe haven. But do you regularly check your smoke alarms? If not, there is the potential for danger. That’s why the Kingsport Fire Department is teaming up with NFPA for Fire Prevention Week and all of October to remind residents that “Working Smoke Alarms Save Lives, Test Yours Every Month!”

  • Almost three of five (60%) of reported home fire deaths in 2007 to 2011 resulted from fires in homes with no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms.
  • Working smoke alarms cut the risk of dying in reported home fires in half.
  • In fires considered large enough to activate the smoke alarm, hardwired alarms operated 93% of the time, while battery powered alarms operated only 79% of the time.
  • When smoke alarms fail to operate, it is usually because batteries are missing, disconnected, or dead.
  • An ionization smoke alarm is generally more responsive to flaming fires and a photoelectric smoke alarm is generally more responsive to smoldering fires. For the best protection, or where extra time is needed, to awaken or assist others, both types of alarms, or combination ionization and photoelectric alarms are recommended.
  • Additionally residents are urged learn how to plan and practice escape from a home in case a fire occurs.

 

The History of Fire Prevention Week

Fire Prevention Week was established to commemorate the Great Chicago Fire, the tragic 1871 conflagration that killed more than 250 people, left 100,000 homeless, destroyed more than 17,400 structures and burned more than 2,000 acres. The fire began on October 8, but continued into and did most of its damage on October 9, 1871.

Commemorating a conflagration
According to popular legend, the fire broke out after a cow – belonging to Mrs. Catherine O’Leary – kicked over a lamp, setting first the barn, then the whole city on fire. Chances are you’ve heard some version of this story yourself; people have been blaming the Great Chicago Fire on the cow and Mrs. O’Leary, for more than 130 years. But recent research by Chicago historian Robert Cromie has helped to debunk this version of events.

But if a cow wasn’t to blame for the huge fire, what was? Over the years, journalists and historians have offered plenty of theories. Some blamed the blaze on a couple of neighborhood boys who were near the barn sneaking cigarettes. Others believed that a neighbor of the O’Leary’s may have started the fire. Some people have speculated that a fiery meteorite may have fallen to earth on October 8, starting several fires that day – in Michigan and Wisconsin, as well as in Chicago.

The biggest blaze that week
While the Great Chicago Fire was the best-known blaze to start during this fiery two-day stretch, it wasn’t the biggest. That distinction goes to the Peshtigo Fire, the most devastating forest fire in American history. The fire, which also occurred on October 8th, 1871, and roared through Northeast Wisconsin, burning down 16 towns, killing 1,152 people, and scorching 1.2 million acres before it ended.

Historical accounts of the fire say that the blaze began when several railroad workers clearing land for tracks unintentionally started a brush fire. Before long, the fast-moving flames were whipping through the area ‘like a tornado,’ some survivors said. It was the small town of Peshtigo, Wisconsin that suffered the worst damage. Within an hour, the entire town had been destroyed.

Nine decades of fire prevention
Those who survived the Chicago and Peshtigo fires never forgot what they’d been through; both blazes produced countless tales of bravery and heroism. But the fires also changed the way that firefighters and public officials thought about fire safety. On the 40th anniversary of the Great Chicago Fire, the Fire Marshals Association of North America (today known as the International Fire Marshals Association), decided that the anniversary of the Great Chicago Fire should henceforth be observed not with festivities, but in a way that would keep the public informed about the importance of fire prevention.  The commemoration grew incrementally official over the years.

In 1920, President Woodrow Wilson issued the first National Fire Prevention Day proclamation, and since 1922, Fire Prevention Week has been observed on the Sunday through Saturday period in which October 9 falls. According to the National Archives and Records Administration’s Library Information Center, Fire Prevention Week is the longest running public health and safety observance on record. The President of the United States has signed a proclamation proclaiming a national observance during that week every year since 1925.

 

Home Fire Safety Tips and Facts:

Home fires

  • In 2011, U.S. fire departments responded to 370,000 home structure fires. These fires caused 13,910 civilian injuries, 2,520 civilian deaths, $6.9 billion in direct damage.
  • On average, seven people died in U.S. home fires per day from 2007 to 2011.
  • Cooking is the leading cause home fires and home fire injuries, followed heating equipment.
  • Smoking is a leading cause of civilian home fire deaths.
  • Most fatal fires kill one or two people. In 2012, 8 home fires killed five or more people resulting in a total of 44 deaths.
  • According to an NFPA survey, only one-third of Americans have both developed and practiced a home fire escape plan.
  • Almost three-quarters of Americans do have an escape plan; however, more than half never practiced it.
  • One-third (32%) of respondents who made an estimate thought they would have at least 6 minutes before a fire in their home would become life threatening. The time available is often less. Only 8% said their first thought on hearing a smoke alarm would be to get out!
  • During 2007-2011 candles caused 3% of home fires, 4% of home fire deaths, 7% of home fire injuries and 6% of direct property damage from home fires.
  • On average, there are 32 home candle fires reported per day.
  • More than one-third of these fires (36%) started in the bedroom; however, the candle industry found that only 13% of candle users burn candles in the bedroom most often.
  • Nearly three in five candle fires (56%) start when things that can burn are too close to the candle.

Escape Planning

  • According to an NFPA survey, only one-third of Americans have both developed and practiced a home fire escape plan.
  • Almost three-quarters of Americans do have an escape plan; however, more than half never practiced it.
  • One-third (32%) of respondents who made an estimate thought they would have at least 6 minutes before a fire in their home would become life threatening. The time available is often less. Only 8% said their first thought on hearing a smoke alarm would be to get out!

Cooking

  • U.S. Fire Departments responded to an estimated annual average of 156,600 cooking-related fires between 2007-2011, resulting in 400 civilian deaths, 5,080 civilian injuries and $853 million in direct damage.
  • Two of every five home fires started in the kitchen.
  • Unattended cooking was a factor in 34% of reported home cooking fires.
  • Two-thirds of home cooking fires started with ignition of food or other cooking materials.
  • Ranges accounted for the 57% of home cooking fire incidents. Ovens accounted for 16%.
  • Children under five face a higher risk of non-fire burns associated with cooking and hot food and drinks than being burned in a cooking fire.
  • Microwave ovens are one of the leading home products associated with scald burn injuries not related to fires. According to the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System, two out of five of the microwave oven injuries seen at emergency rooms in 2011 were scald burns.
  • Clothing was the item first ignited in less than 1% of home cooking fires, but these incidents accounted for 15% of the cooking fire deaths.

Heating

  • The leading factor contributing to heating equipment fires was failure to clean, principally creosote from solid fueled heating equipment, primarily chimneys.
  • Portable or fixed space heaters, including wood stoves, were involved in one-third (33%) of home heating fires and four out of five (81%) home heating deaths.
  • Half of home heating fire deaths resulted from fires caused by heating equipment too close to things that can burn, such as upholstered furniture, clothing, mattresses or bedding.
  • In most years, heating equipment is the second leading cause of home fires, fire deaths, and fire injuries.
  • Fixed or portable space heaters are involved in about 4 out of 5 heating fire deaths.

Smoking materials

  • During 2007-2011 smoking materials caused an estimated 17,900 home structure fires, resulting in 580 deaths, 1,280 injuries and $509 million in direct property damage, per year.
  • Sleep was a factor in 31% of the home smoking material fire deaths.
  • Possible alcohol impairment was a factor in one in five (18%) of home smoking fire deaths.
  • In recent years, Canada and the United States have required that all cigarettes sold must be “fire safe,” that is have reduced ignition strength and less likely to start fires.

Electrical

  • About half (48%) of home electrical fires involved electrical distribution or lighting equipment. Other leading types of equipment were washer or dryer, fan, portable or stationary space heater, air conditioning equipment water heater and range.
  • Electrical failure or malfunctions caused an average of almost 48,000 home fires per year, resulting in roughly 450 deaths and nearly $1.5 billion in direct property damage.

Candles

  • During 2007-2011 candles caused 3% of home fires, 4% of home fire deaths, 7% of home fire injuries and 6% of direct property damage from home fires.
  • On average, there are 32 home candle fires reported per day.
  • More than one-third of these fires (36%) started in the bedroom; however, the candle industry found that only 13% of candle users burn candles in the bedroom most often.
  • Nearly three in five candle fires (56%) start when things that can burn are too close to the candle.
– Reproduced from NFPA’s Fire Prevention Week website, www.firepreventionweek.org. ©2014 NFPA

For more information contact the Kingsport Fire Department’s Public Education Officer Barry Brickey at 423-224-2820

Kingsport fire fighters photo

cst7514

Around 11AM on Friday, Kingsport Firefighters (C-Shift) were notified of a possible structure fire on the 1600 block of C Street. C-3, Engine 1, Engine 2, Engine 3, Ladder 1, and Fire-Rescue 12 responded to the scene. Upon arrival, fire units had smoke and fire visible from the attic area of the residence on the D side. Firefighters entered the structure to find light smoke conditions in the residence, but were able to quickly locate the fire in the attic area. The crew made access to the attic, and began a quick extinguishment of the fire. A ventilation crew made their way to the roof, where they cut a ventilation hole to help expel the smoke. Crews remained on-scene while they finished extinguishing the fire and cleaned up.

mullinsfire

Just before noon on Thursday, Kingsport Firefighters (B-Shift) were alerted of a possible structure fire near the intersection of Lynn Garden Drive and Mullins Street. As units responded, smoke was visible from a distance and the 911 calls continued to come in. C-3 arrived on-scene a two story wood-framed residence with heavy smoke showing and assumed Mullins Street Command.